The current open positions in the Division of Nutritional Sciences are:

Lecturer in Nutrition and Public Health
Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutrition Sciences is seeking a full‐time nine‐month Lecturer to start on July 1, 2018.

Every spring this Lecturer will co‐teach a course that requires public health and/or nutrition expertise. In addition, they will be expected to design and deliver a three‐credit course, which has broad appeal on campus and aligns with their expertise, and start delivering this course during the second year of their appointment.

Every fall this Lecturer will provide overall course management and support for two large three‐credit undergraduate courses (NS1150 ‐ Nutrition Health & Society and NS1600 ‐ Introduction to Public Health) and be solely responsible for two smaller courses related to NS1150 (NS1160 ‐ Personalized Concepts & Controversies and NS4030 ‐ Teaching Apprenticeship).

This Lecturer will also advise twenty undergraduate students and supervise and mentor the Division’s two Teaching and Research Fellows.

The first year this Lecturer will work from July 1, 2018 through the end of the semester (approximately May 15, 2019). The following years they will work only during the academic year (approximately August 15 through May 15). However, they will be appointed for the entire calendar year and will be paid in twenty‐four installments for their work.

NS1150 (Nutrition Health and Society) is a three‐credit fall course that discusses the facts and fallacies concerning the role that nutrition, exercise, and other health behaviors play in preventing disease, maintaining good health, and maximizing athletic performance. Emphasis is on understanding the biological mechanisms through which good nutrition and regular exercise affect psychological and physical health.

NS1160 (Personalized Concepts and Controversies) is a one‐credit fall course that provides students enrolled in NS1150 individualized assistance in many skills including using computers to analyze diets, finding and using scientific references, understanding and criticizing scientific articles, and reviewing material presented in lectures. This course is instructed by the Undergraduate Teaching Assistants enrolled in NS4030.

NS1600 (Introduction to Public Health) is a three‐credit fall course that provides the basic principles, practices, and policies of public health, including an introduction to the infrastructure and organization of public health; methods of data collection and surveillance; disease promotion and prevention; health disparities; and the achievements, challenges, and controversies in the field.

NS4030 (Teaching Apprenticeship) is a five‐credit S‐U or letter grade course for the Undergraduate Teaching Assistants (UTAs) assigned to NS1150 and NS1160.

Responsibilities Include:

NS1150 & NS1600:

  • Contribute to course content .
  • Administer the course including electronic course management.
  • Hold office hours for enrolled students.
  • Respond to student questions through email. Develop exam questions.
  • Grade assignments.
  • Deliver occasional lectures.
  • Supervise graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants.
  • Prepare and update course material (syllabus, group activities, presentations, etc.)
  • Coordinate scheduling of guest lecturers and coordinate parking accommodations, etc.

NS1160/NS4030:

  • Develop syllabi for NS1160 and NS4030, including learning outcomes.
  • Develop and deliver lectures on various pedagogical techniques, for example, how to write lesson plans, how to develop a good relationship with students, developing a daily agenda for class, how to lead a discussion, how to create effective learning environments, how to design teaching to accommodate multiple learning styles, methods for evaluating assignments, etc.;
  • Instruct teaching assistants in the development of teaching tools, such as review guides, flow charts, mini‐quizzes and other materials. Develop evaluation methods for NS 4030 teaching assistants/students, including assignments, teaching observations, student evaluations, peer evaluations, and self‐reflection using e‐Portfolio and assign grades.
  • Instruct NS4030 teaching assistants in theory and methods for developing student evaluations of their teaching.
  • Develop e‐Portfolio site for teaching assistants’ assignments and reflection.
  • Manage the 70’s Club, a weekly tutorial session for NS1150 students run by Undergraduate Teaching Assistants.
  • Assign grades for NS1160 students.

Required qualifications: M.P.H or M.S. in Nutrition or Public Health and teaching experience.

Preferred qualifications: PhD in Nutrition or Public Health, R.D. credential, experience with BlackBoard and e‐Portfolio.

Required Competencies:

  • Planning, organization, problem‐solving, and coordination;
  • Good public speaking skills;
  • Ability to work as a member of a team and under pressure;
  • Ability to lead and organize teaching teams comprised of graduate and undergraduate students;
  • Proficiency using the electronic medium and software packages such as email and internet browsers, Microsoft Office Word Suite, especially Word, Excel and Power Point.

Application Requirements:

The following documents must be uploaded when applying through Academic Jobs on Line:

  • a CV;
  • general letter of interest; and
  • a teaching statement.

In addition the applicant must arrange to have three letters of recommendation uploaded to https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10465.

Assistant/Associate/Full Professor (Two positions are open)
Global Health and Nutrition
Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutritional Sciences is seeking candidates for two 9‐month, full‐salaried, tenure‐track positions at the rank of assistant, associate or full professor at Cornell University. The candidates for this position should be outstanding research scientists with a recognized scholarly reputation, appropriate for rank, in the broad area of nutrition and global health. Successful candidates should have experience in interdisciplinary research addressing the biological systems and networks that underlie the origin and etiology of nutrition‐related complex traits in human populations. Candidates may have disciplinary expertise in epidemiology, evolutionary biology, population genetics, demography, computing and information science, and/or medicine. The qualifications of the candidate will determine the rank of the tenured/tenure‐track appointment at the level of an assistant, associate or full professor. Candidates are expected to be leaders in their disciplines and interested in advancing the understanding of the connection between nutrition and health. Interest in teaching at the undergraduate and/or graduate level is required. Commensurate with rank, research excellence should be demonstrated by an active, externally‐funded research program as well as by a substantial record of publication in recognized journals and books. Scholarship related to nutrition and human health, in the broadest sense, should be central to the candidate's research program. Participation in the Division’s graduate and undergraduate teaching programs related to global and public health nutrition is expected.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences is a broadly based interdisciplinary unit that integrates theories and methods from across many academic disciplines to understand the complex relationships among biology, nutrition, food systems and lifestyle patterns, social and institutional environments and governmental policies in human health. These professors has the potential to develop collaborations with faculty who have broad interests in basic and applied aspects of global health, human biology and metabolism, agriculture and food systems and human nutrition. This position is aligned with University initiatives in big data, information sciences, and global and public health.

Academic Environment at Cornell University

Cornell is a major Land Grant research and teaching institution established in 1865 with both endowed and state assisted units. The student population on the Ithaca campus is approximately 5,350 graduate/professional students and 13,670 undergraduates. Cornell offers a strong, interdisciplinary research environment. Recently, the university initiated campus‐wide investments in the Life Sciences, the Cornell Population Program, the Institute for Social Sciences, the Global Health Program, and the Weill Cornell Medical College and Cornell Technology Campus, which are located in New York City.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutritional Sciences (DNS) at Cornell University is among the largest academic units in the United States devoted to human nutrition. DNS is a multi‐disciplinary unit with scholarly activities that integrate knowledge from the physical, biological and social sciences in the areas of molecular, human, international and community nutrition through teaching, research, and outreach related to food, food systems, nutrition and health. Multidisciplinary research, graduate training, and outreach programs include Maternal & Child Nutrition, Nutritional Genomics, Food Systems for Health and Nutrition, Global Health & International Nutrition and Obesity & Chronic Disease. In carrying out its mission, DNS supports and contributes to advancements in basic disciplines and promotes the health and well‐being of populations in the US and globally. The DNS undergraduate program consists of four majors. The Nutritional Sciences major and the Global and Public Health Sciences major are offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Human Ecology. The Human Biology, Health and Society major is offered through the College of Human Ecology, and the concentration in Nutrition in the Biological Sciences Major is offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences. The Division of Nutritional Sciences is the administrative home for the Cornell Graduate Field of Nutrition and the Graduate Field of Epidemiology.

Cornell University is an equal opportunity employer.

Qualifications:

  • PhD, ScD, MD, DrPH, DVM or equivalent degree in human or public health nutrition, epidemiology, demography, medicine and/or the quantitative sciences including computational biology, population genetics or in a related field;
  • Demonstrated research excellence in areas including, but not limited to, biological systems and networks linked to nutrition‐related phenotypes, maternal and child nutrition, obesity and chronic disease prevention, and/or food systems for human health and nutrition.
  • Experience teaching at the undergraduate and/or graduate level;
  • Research excellence should be demonstrated by a substantial record of publication (in books and recognized journals) in the field and a strong history of externally supported research, commensurate with rank;
  • Scholarship related to food, diet, nutrition and human health, in the broadest sense should be central to the candidate's research program.
  • Interest in building academic linkages within DNS program areas, and with other departments and centers throughout the university such as the Weill Cornell Medical College, the Cornell Population Program, the Center for Comparative and Population Genomics, etc.

Responsibilities:

The candidate is expected to:

  • Maintain a vigorous, externally funded research program;
  • Maintain a high level of scholarly activity;
  • Mentor graduate students;
  • Forge professional relationships within the Division of Nutritional Sciences and other academic units on campus;
  • Participate in the Division of Nutritional Sciences’ graduate and undergraduate teaching programs.

Academic Rank and Compensation:

Assistant, Associate or Full Professor with 9‐month appointment and expectation of tenure. Position is designated as 50% effort in research, 50% in teaching/instruction. Salary level will depend on experience and expertise and will be competitive with comparable positions at peer universities. Two jobs are being searched, one at open rank and one at the rank of Assistant Professor.

Applicants must apply through Academic Jobs Online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/9729 and upload a cover letter, CV, research statement and a teaching statement. Applicants must also arrange to that three confidential letters of recommendation submitted through Academic Jobs Online.

The review of applications will begin in October of 2017. Interviews will commence in November of 2017.

Assistant Professor (One position is open)
Social & Behavioral Science

Division of Nutritional Sciences

Candidates for this position are expected to demonstrate future promise for establishing and maintaining a vibrant, independent and extramurally‐funded research program, and for teaching undergraduate and graduate students. The qualifications of the candidate should be consistent with a tenure‐track appointment at the level of an assistant professor, with a doctoral degree in a social science discipline such as sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology or another social science field. Prospective candidates should have foundational knowledge and experience in interdisciplinary research at the interface of food, eating, or human nutrition and the social and behavioral sciences, with an interest in US community or public health settings. Demonstrated research excellence in areas of interest include, but are not limited to, maternal and child nutrition, obesity and chronic disease prevention, and nutrition disparities. Research excellence should be demonstrated through publications in recognized journals and prior experience in seeking independent research funding is highly desirable. The applicant must have an interest in and be qualified to teach an undergraduate course on Social Science Perspectives on Food and Nutrition and a graduate level course. Demonstrated scholarship within community and public health nutrition is central to this position.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences is a broadly based interdisciplinary unit that integrates theories and methods from across many academic disciplines to understand the complex relationships among biology, nutrition, food systems and lifestyle patterns, social and institutional environments and governmental policies in relation to human health. This position recognizes and highlights the importance of the relationship of factors in the social, cultural, information/electronic, economic, physical, and policy environments to the health and nutritional well‐being of human populations. The successful candidate should have experience in and/or the potential to develop collaborations with other faculty who have broad interests in basic and applied aspects of food and nutrition.

Academic Environment at Cornell University

Cornell is a major Land Grant research and teaching institution established in 1865 with both endowed and stateassisted units. The student population on the Ithaca campus is approximately 5,350 graduate/professional students and 13,670 undergraduates. Cornell offers a strong, interdisciplinary research environment. Recently, the university initiated campus‐wide investments in the Life Sciences, the Cornell Population Program, the Institute for Social Sciences, the Global Health Program, and the Weill Cornell Medical College and Cornell Technology Campus, which are located in New York City.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutritional Sciences (DNS) at Cornell University is among the largest academic units in the United States devoted to human nutrition. DNS is a multi‐disciplinary unit with scholarly activities that integrate knowledge from the physical, biological and social sciences in the areas of molecular, human, international and community nutrition through teaching, research, and outreach related to food, food systems, nutrition and health. Multidisciplinary research, graduate training, and outreach programs include Maternal & Child Nutrition, Nutritional Genomics, Food Systems for Health and Nutrition, Global Health & International Nutrition and Obesity & Chronic Disease. In carrying out its mission, DNS supports and contributes to advancements in basic disciplines and promotes the health and well‐being of populations in the US and globally. The DNS undergraduate program consists of four majors. The Nutritional Sciences major and the Global and Public Health Sciences major are offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Human Ecology. The Human Biology, Health and Society major is offered through the College of Human Ecology, and the concentration in Nutrition in the Biological Sciences Major is offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences. The Division of Nutritional Sciences is the administrative home for the Cornell Graduate Field of Nutrition and the Graduate Field of Epidemiology.

Cornell University is an equal opportunity employer.

Qualifications:

  • PhD, ScD, DrPH, or related degree in a social science discipline (i.e. sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology, or another social science field) with foundational knowledge and a research focus at the interface of the social sciences and food, eating, and nutrition in U.S. community/public health settings;
  • Demonstrated research excellence in areas generating knowledge that contributes to theory, methods, practice, and policy for understanding social aspects of food, eating, and nutrition in the context of nutritional disparities, maternal and child nutrition, obesity and chronic disease prevention, or other areas;
  • Interest and/or experience in teaching at the undergraduate and/or graduate level with a focus on application of the social sciences to the study of food and nutrition;
  • Research excellence that is demonstrated through publications in peer‐reviewed journals in the field; and
  • Experience in grant writing and/or a history of obtaining independent research funding.

Responsibilities:
The candidate is expected to:

  • Initiate and sustain a vigorous, externally funded research program;
  • Teach undergraduate and/or graduate courses related to social science expertise and food, eating, and nutrition;
  • Mentor and train graduate students;
  • Maintain a high level of scholarly activity; and
  • Forge professional relationships within the Division of Nutritional Sciences and with other academic units on campus and beyond.

Academic Rank and Compensation:

Assistant Professor with 9‐month appointment and expectation of tenure. Position is designated as 60% effort in research, 40% in teaching/instruction. Salary level will depend on experience and expertise and will be competitive with comparable positions at peer universities.

Applicants must apply through Academic Jobs Online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10158 and upload a cover letter, CV, research statement and a teaching statement. Applicants must also arrange to that three confidential letters of recommendation submitted through Academic Jobs Online.

Review of applications will begin in November of 2017 and will continue until this position has been filled. Start date for this position is as soon as July 1, 2018.

Assistant Professor (One position is open)
Nutritional Chemistry

Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University is seeking candidates for a 9-month, full-salaried, tenure-track assistant professor position in Nutritional Chemistry. The candidates for this position should be outstanding research scientists. The successful candidate will have an interest in establishing and integrating novel methods, technologies and measures for assessing nutrient and bioactive food component needs in human health and disease. Research areas of interest include, but are not limited to, development and validation of new diet-related biomarkers of exposure, status and function; novel systems approaches to quantify markers of physiological networks related to dietary needs; precision nutrition; nanoscale sensors; medical or printable foods; bioactive food components; and, computational approaches to assessing nutrient needs.

Research excellence should be demonstrated by the existence or potential for building an active, externally-funded research program as well as by a strong record of publication in recognized journals. Scholarship related to nutrition and human health, in the broadest sense, should be central to the candidate's research program. Interest in and qualification to teach an undergraduate course on the physical, chemical and biological aspects of foods, and to contribute to a graduate level course is required.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences is a broadly based interdisciplinary unit that integrates theories and methods from across many academic disciplines to understand the complex relationships among biology, nutrition, food systems and lifestyle patterns, social and institutional environments and governmental policies in human health. The professor has the potential to develop collaborations with faculty who have broad interests in basic and applied aspects of mammalian biology and metabolism, systems biology and human nutrition.

Academic Environment at Cornell University

Cornell is a major Land Grant research and teaching institution established in 1865 with both endowed and state-assisted units. The student population on the Ithaca campus is approximately 5,350 graduate/professional students and 13,670 undergraduates. Cornell offers a strong, interdisciplinary research environment. Recently, the university initiated campus-wide investments in the Life Sciences, the Cornell Population Program, the Institute for Social Sciences, the Global Health Program, and the Weill Cornell Medical College and Cornell Technology Campus, which are located in New York City.

The Division of Nutritional Sciences

The Division of Nutritional Sciences (DNS) at Cornell University is among the largest academic units in the United States devoted to human nutrition. DNS is a multi-disciplinary unit with scholarly activities that integrate knowledge from the physical, biological and social sciences in the areas of molecular, human, international and community nutrition through teaching, research, and outreach related to food, food systems, nutrition and health. Multidisciplinary research, graduate training, and outreach programs include Maternal & Child Nutrition, Nutritional Genomics, Food Systems for Health and Nutrition, Global Health & International Nutrition and Obesity & Chronic Disease. In carrying out its mission, DNS supports and contributes to advancements in basic disciplines and promotes the health and well-being of populations in the US and globally. The DNS undergraduate program consists of four majors. The Nutritional Sciences major and the Global and Public Health Sciences major are offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Human Ecology. The Human Biology, Health and Society major is offered through the College of Human Ecology, and the concentration in Nutrition in the Biological Sciences Major is offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Arts and Sciences. The Division of Nutritional Sciences is the administrative home for the Cornell Graduate Field of Nutrition and the Graduate Field of Epidemiology.

Cornell University is an equal opportunity employer.

Qualifications:

  • PhD, ScD, MD, DrPH or equivalent degree in nutrition, food science, food technology, biochemistry, chemistry,the biological sciences, engineering, information science, and/or medicine;
  • Scholarship related to food, diet, nutrition and human health, in the broadest sense, should be central to the candidate's research program;
  • Interest or experience in teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level; interest in participating in the Division of Nutritional Sciences’ graduate and undergraduate teaching programs, including participation in NS3450, Introduction to Physiochemical & Biological Aspects of Foods.
  • Research excellence should be demonstrated by a strong record of publication (in recognized journals) in the field and a strong history of externally supported research, commensurate with rank;
  • Interest in building academic linkages within DNS program areas, and with other departments and centers throughout the University.

Responsibilities:
The candidate is expected to:

  • Maintain a vigorous, externally funded research program;
  • Maintain a high level of scholarly activity;
  • Mentor graduate students;
  • Forge professional relationships within the Division of Nutritional Sciences and other academic units on campus; and
  • Participate in the Division of Nutritional Sciences’ graduate and undergraduate teaching programs, including participation in NS3450, Introduction to Physiochemical & Biological Aspects of Foods.

Academic Rank and Compensation:

Assistant Professor with 9-month appointment and expectation of tenure. Position is designated as 60% effort in research, 40% in teaching/instruction. Salary level will depend on experience and expertise and will be competitive with comparable positions at peer universities.

Applicants must apply through Academic Jobs Online at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/10098 and upload a cover letter, CV, research statement and a teaching statement. Applicants must also arrange to that three confidential letters of recommendation submitted through Academic Jobs Online.

Review of applications will continue until this position has been filled. Start date for this position is as soon as July 1, 2018.