Selected Publications

2020 & 2021

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2020).  Cambridge handbook of intelligence (2nd ed.).  New York: Cambridge University Press.
 A two-volume, extremely comprehensive review of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2020).  My biggest research mistake.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 A text on the kinds of mistakes psychologists have made in their careers.

Sternberg, R. J., & Glueck, J. (Eds.) (2019).  Cambridge handbook of wisdom.  New York: Cambridge University Press.
 A comprehensive handbook of wisdom.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2020).  Human intelligence: An introduction.  New York: Cambridge University Press.
 An edited textbook on intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2020).  Perspectives on hate: How it originates, develops, manifests, and spreads.  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
A timely book on hate and how it spreads.

Sorokowski, P., Sorokowska, A., Karwowski, M., Groyecka, A., Aavik, T., …Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  Universality of the triangular theory of love: Adaptation and psychometric properties of the Triangular Love Scale in 25 countries. Journal of Sex Research. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224499.2020.1787318
An international validation showing that the triangular theory of love works in 25 different countries.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020, August 31).  COVID-19 has taught us what intelligence really is.  Inside higher ed, https://insidehighered.com/views/2020/08/31/pandemic-has-proven-standardized-tests-dont-measure-whats-important-opinion
In this article, I argue that COVID-19 has taught us what intelligence really is, and it’s not IQ.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  Rethinking what we mean by intelligence. Phi Delta Kappan.https://kappanonline.org/rethinking-what-we-mean-by-intelligence-sternberg/
In this article, I explain for educators the theory of adaptive intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020). Toward a theory of musical intelligence. Psychology of Music, https://doi.org/10.1177/0305735620963765
A theory of musical intelligence combining my own theory of successful intelligence with Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  Transformational giftedness: Rethinking our paradigm for gifted education. Roeper Review, 42(4), 230-240. https://doi.org/10.1080/02783193.2020.1815266
Presents a new theory of transformational giftedness, in contrast to transactional giftedness.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  Toward a triangular theory of love for one’s musical instruments. Psychology of Music, https://doi.org/10.1177/0305735620961143
Presents the application of the triangular theory of love to musical instruments.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  The nature of intelligence and its development in childhood.  New York: Cambridge University Press.
A book for non-specialists on intelligence and how it develops.

Sternberg, R. J. (2021).  Adaptive intelligence: Surviving and thriving in a world of uncertainty. New York: Cambridge University Press.
A full presentation of my theory of adaptive intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  FLOTSAM: A theory of the development and transmission of hate.  In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Perspectives on hate: How it originates, develops, manifests, and spreads (pp. 3-24).  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  FLOTSAM in practice: Understanding the reawakening of hate in the modern world.  In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Perspectives on hate: How it originates, develops, manifests, and spreads (pp. 161-175).  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  FLOTSAM themes in this book and The Butter Battle Book.  In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Perspectives on hate: How it originates, develops, manifests, and spreads (pp. 301-314).  Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
 Papers on the FLOTSAM model of hate.

Sternberg, R. J., Todhunter, R. J. E., Litvak, A., & Sternberg, R. J. (2020).  The relation of scientific creativity and evaluation of scientific impact to scientific reasoning and general intelligence.  Journal of Intelligence, https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence8020017
Four of our papers on scientific reasoning showing that SAT-type tests are poor measures of scientific-reasoning skills.

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2018 & 2019

Sternberg, R. J. (2019).  Introduction to the Cambridge Handbook of Wisdom: Race to Samarra: The critical importance of wisdom in the world today.  In R. J. Sternberg & J. Glueck (Eds.), Cambridge handbook of wisdom (pp. 3-9).  New York: Cambridge University Press.
Why humanity is racing in the wrong direction.

Sternberg, R. J. (2019).  A theory of adaptive intelligence and its relation to general intelligence.  Journal of Intelligence, https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence7040023
My first theory paper on adaptive intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2019).  When love goes awry (Part 1):  Applications of the duplex theory of love and its development to relationships gone bad.  In R. J. Sternberg & K. Sternberg (Eds.), The new psychology of love (2nd ed., pp. 280-299).  New York: Cambridge University Press.
Applying the duplex theory of love to relationships that have gone bad.

Sternberg, R. J. (2019).  Where have all the flowers of wisdom gone?  An analysis of teaching of wisdom over the years.  In R. J. Sternberg, H. Nusbaum, & J. Glueck (Eds.) (2019). Applying wisdom to contemporary world problems (pp. 1-20).  Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave-Macmillan.
Shows that teaching of wisdom has declined over a period of a century.

Sternberg, R. J. (2019). Why people often prefer wise guys to guys who are wise: An augmented balance theory of the production and reception of wisdom. In R. J. Sternberg & J. Glueck (Eds.), Cambridge handbook of wisdom (pp. 162-181).  New York: Cambridge University Press. 
Updated paper on balance theory of wisdom.

Sternberg, R. J., Wong, C. H., & Sternberg, K. (2019).  The relation of tests of scientific reasoning to each other and to tests of fluid intelligence.  Journal of Intelligence, 7(3), 20, https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence7030020

Sternberg, R. J. (2018).  Speculations on the role of successful intelligence in solving contemporary world problems.  Journal of Intelligence, 6(1), 4, http://www.mdpi.com/2079-3200/6/1/4/html. doi: 10.3390/jintelligence6010004.

Sternberg, R. J. (2018).  Why real-world problems go unresolved and what we can do about it: Inferences from a limited-resource model of successful intelligence.  Journal of Intelligence, (3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jintelligence6030044 
The precursors to my work on adaptive intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2018).  A triangular theory of creativity.  Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 12, 50-67.
My first paper on the triangular theory of creativity.

Sternberg, R. J.  (2018). Wisdom, foolishness, and toxicity in human development. Research in Human Development, DOI: 10.1080/15427609.2018.1491216
A discussion of how wisdom relates to foolishness and toxicity.

Sternberg, R. J., & Kaufman, J. C. (2018).  Societal forces that ERODE creativity. Teachers College Record, 120 (5), pp. 1-18. http://www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp?ContentId=22093.
A discussion of how societal forces erode creativity.

Sternberg, R. J. (2018).  21 ideas: A 42-year search to understand the nature of giftedness. Roeper Review, 40, 7-20. http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/rBfKGCrAhAyzxKgwHQGU/full.
A paper of reflections on a career partly spent studying giftedness.

Sternberg, R. J. (2018). FLOTSAM: A new model for the development and transmission of hate. Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jts5.25 

2010-2017

Sternberg, R. J. (2010). College admissions for the 21st century. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
The culmination of a fairly extensive program of work on college admissions, based on the theory of successful intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2010). The dark side of creativity and how to combat it. In D. H. Cropley, A. J. Cropley, J. C. Kaufman, & M. A. Runco (Eds.), The dark side of creativity (pp. 316-328). New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first take on the dark side of creativity.

Sternberg, R. J., Bonney, C. R., Gabora, L., Karelitz, T., & Coffin, L. (2010). Broadening the spectrum of undergraduate admissions. College and University, 86(1), 2-17.
A review of our college-admissions work.

Sternberg, R. J. (2011).  Slip-sliding away, down the ethical slope.  Chronicle of Higher Education, 57(19), A23.
An essay on how we are all susceptible to sliding down ethical slippery slopes.

Zhang, L.-F., Sternberg, R. J., & Rayner, S. (Eds.).  (2012).  Handbook of intellectual styles.  New York: Springer.
A handbook of intellectual-styles research.

Sternberg, R. J. (2013).  Searching for love.  The Psychologist, 26(2), 98-101.

Sternberg, R. J. (2013).  Measuring love.  The Psychologist, 26(2), 101.
A review of my work on love up to the time.

Sternberg, R. J. (2014, February 26).  Academic tribalism.  Chronicle of Higher Education. http://chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/02/26/academic-tribalism/.
A
discussion of tribalism in academia, which is rampant still.

Sternberg, R. J. (2014).  I study what I stink at: Lessons learned from a career in psychology.  Annual Review of Psychology, 65, 1-16.
A review of the history of my research and why I did what I did.

Sternberg, R. J. (2014). Murky environments in academe.  Chronicle of Higher Education, http://chronicle.com/article/Murky-Environments-in-Academe/147057/?cid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en.
An essay on murky environments and how they affect our lives.

Sternberg, R. J., Jarvin, L., Birney, D., Naples, A., Stemler, S., Newman, T., Otterbach, R., Randi, J., & 

Grigorenko, E. L. (2014).  Testing the theory of successful intelligence in teaching grade 4 language arts, mathematics, and science. Journal of Educational Psychology, 106, 881-899.
Report on a large and failed upscaling, from which we learned that if you do not closely monitor fidelity to the planned treatment, you might as well not do the study.

Sternberg, R. J. (May 29, 2015).  Career advice from an oldish not quite geezer.  Chronicle of Higher Education, 61(37), A27-28. http://chronicle.com/article/Career-Advice-From-an-Oldish/230335/.
Some of the better career advice I have given.  And I thought I was old then!

Sternberg, R. J. (2015).  Still searching for the Zipperumpazoo: A reflection after 40 years.  Child Development Perspectives, 9(2), 106-110.
A review of my research for the first 40 years of my career.

Sternberg, R. J. (2016).  What universities can be: A new model for preparing students for active concerned citizenship and ethical leadership.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
My one and only book on universities.

Sternberg, R. J., Fiske, S. T., & Foss, D. J. (Eds.) (2016).  Scientists making a difference: One hundred eminent behavioral and brain scientists talk about their most important contributions New York: Cambridge University Press.
Contributions from 100 truly eminent psychological scientists on what made their careers what they were.  They had in common their willingness to defy the crowd.

Sternberg, R. J. (2017).  ACCEL: A new model for identifying the gifted.  Roeper Review, 39(3), 139-152. http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/kSvRMFf9R8tAJPDRfXrJ/full.
Application of the ACCEL (active, concerned citizenship and ethical leadership) model to identification of the gifted.

Sternberg, R. J. (2017). The danger of contempt in universities and in modern society.  Journal of College and Character, 18(3), 208-214.
Contempt is rife in academia.  Bad idea.

Sternberg, R. J. (2017).  Starting your career in academic psychology.  Washington, DC: APA Books.
I think one of my better books on career advice.

Sternberg, R. J. (2017).  We can do better than fads.  In S. O. Lilienfeld & I. D. Waldman (Eds.), Psychological science under scrutiny: Recent challenges and proposed solutions (pp. 340-348). New York: Wiley.
A paper on the danger of fads, which are omnipresent in psychology.

Sternberg, R. J., & Sternberg, K. (2017).  Measuring scientific reasoning for graduate admissions in psychology and related disciplines. Journal of Intelligence, http://www.mdpi.com/2079-3200/5/3/29/pdf.

Sternberg, R. J., Sternberg, K., & Todhunter, R. J. E. (2017). Measuring reasoning about teaching for graduate admissions in psychology and related disciplines.  Journal of Intelligence, www.mdpi.com/2079-3200/5/4/34/pdf.

2000-2010

Grigorenko, E. L., Sternberg, R. J., & Ehrman, M. E. (2000). A theory-based approach to the measurement of foreign language learning ability: The CANAL-F theory and test. The Modern Language Journal, 84(3), 390–405.
My first attempt to develop a test of language-learning ability.

Sternberg, R. J. (2000). In search of the zipperump-a-zoo: Half a career spent trying to find the right questions to ask about the nature of human intelligence. The Psychologist, 13(5), 250–255.
My first career retrospective—after 25 years.

Sternberg, R. J. (2000). Making school reform work: A “mineralogical” theory of school modifiability. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.
A theory of organizational modifiability—it never too off.

Sternberg, R. J. (2000). Pathways to psychology (2nd ed.). Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
An attempt to write a lower level introductory-psychology textbook.

Sternberg, R. J., Forsythe, G. B., Hedlund, J., Horvath, J., Snook, S., Williams, W. M., Wagner, R. K., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2000). Practical intelligence in everyday life. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R. J., Hedlund, J. (2002). Practical intelligence, g, and work psychology. Human Performance 15(1/2), 143–160.
Our major works on practical intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2000). Teaching for successful intelligence. Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Training and Publishing Inc.
Our first attempt to present a comprehensive and systematic introduction to teaching for successful intelligence.

Grigorenko, E. L., Geissler, P. W., Prince, R., Okatcha, F., Nokes, C., Kenny, D. A., Bundy, D. A., &
Sternberg, R. J. (2001). The organization of Luo conceptions of intelligence: A study of implicit theories in a Kenyan village. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 25(4), 367–378. 
I have come to realize that Luo conceptions of intelligence tell us much more about intelligence than does sterile g theory.

Grigorenko, E. L., & Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Analytical, creative, and practical intelligence as predictors of self–reported adaptive functioning: A case study in Russia. Intelligence, 29, 57–73.
We showed that practical intelligence became more important in Russia following the fall of Communism.

Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Why schools should teach for wisdom: The balance theory of wisdom in educational settings. Educational Psychologist, 36(4), 227–245.
An early attempt to show why it is so important to teach for wisdom in the schools.

Sternberg, R. J., & Ben-Zeev, T. (2001). Complex cognition: The psychology of human thought. New York: Oxford University Press.
An attempt to write a comprehensive overview of the field of complex cognition as it existed at the time. 

Sternberg, R. J., Castejón, J. L., Prieto, M. D., Hautamäki, J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2001). Confirmatory factor analysis of the Sternberg triarchic abilities test in three international samples: An empirical test of the triarchic theory of intelligence. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 17(1) 1–16. 
An early demonstration that multiple-choice assessment of creative and practical intelligence is of very limited success.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2001). All testing is dynamic testing. Issues in Education, 7(2), 137–170.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2002). Dynamic testing. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Our most comprehensive analyses of the costs and benefits of dynamic testing.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2001). Unified psychology. American Psychologist, 56(12), 1069–1079.
An attempt to argue for the unification of psychology as a discipline—followed in the footsteps of one of my advisors, Lee Cronbach.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (2001). Educational psychology. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
First edition of our educational-psychology text.

Williams, W. M., Markle, F., Brigockas, M., & Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Creative intelligence for school (CIFS): 21 lessons to enhance creativity in middle and high school students. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Another attempt to write about teaching for creativity, based on a program we formulated.

Grigorenko, E. L., Jarvin, L., & Sternberg, R. J. (2002). School–based tests of the triarchic theory of intelligence: Three settings, three samples, three syllabi. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 27, 167–208.
Shows the application of the triarchic theory to reading instruction.

Sternberg, R. J. (2002). Smart people are not stupid, but they sure can be foolish: The imbalance theory of foolishness. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Why smart people can be so stupid (pp. 232–242). New Haven: Yale University Press.
My first article on foolishness.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (2002). Why smart people can be so stupid. New Haven: Yale University Press.
A timely book on why people who seem smart often don’t act that way.

Hedlund, J., Forsythe, G. B., Horvath, J. A., Williams, W. M., Snook, S., & Sternberg, R. J. (2003). Identifying and assessing tacit knowledge: Understanding the practical intelligence of military leaders. Leadership Quarterly, 14, 117–140.
Show the application of our work on practical intelligence to military leadership.

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). A duplex theory of hate: Development and application to terrorism, massacres, and genocide. Review of General Psychology. 7(3), 299–328.
My first presentation of the duplex theory of hate.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (2003). Psychologists defying the crowd: Stories of those who battled the establishment and won. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
An important edited book for me—shows that really great psychologists are willing to defy the crowd, despite the price they pay for doing so.

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). WICS: A model for leadership in organizations. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 2, 386–401.
My first presentation of WICS as a theory of leadership.

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). Wisdom, intelligence, and creativity synthesized. New York: Cambridge University Press. 
My first major attempt to synthesize wisdom, intelligence, and creativity.

Sternberg, R. J., Kaufman, J. C., & Pretz, J. E. (2003). A propulsion model of creative leadership. Leadership Quarterly, 14, 455–473.
Our application of the propulsion model of creative contributions to leadership.

Cianciolo, A. T., & Sternberg, R. J. (2004). A brief history of intelligence. Malden, MA: Blackwell.
My first attempt, with a collaborator, to write a history of the field of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (2004). Culture and intelligence. American Psychologist, 59(5), 325–338.
My APA presidential address on the relationship between culture and intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (2004). International handbook of intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.
An attempt to look at intelligence from an international perspective, something that had been lacking at the time.

Sternberg, R. J. (2004). Psychology 101½ : The unspoken rules for success in academia. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
My first attempt to write a book on lessons I had learned from a career in psychology.

Sternberg, R. J., The Rainbow Project Collaborators, & University of Michigan Business School Project Collaborators (2004). Theory based university admissions testing for a new millennium. Educational Psychologist, 39(3), 185–198.
A presentation of our work at the time on admissions testing.

Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L., & Kidd, K. K. (2005). Intelligence, race, and genetics. American Psychologist, 60(1), 46–59.
An analysis of the race concept in intelligence—and how it has led researchers astray.

Sternberg, R. J., & Jordan, J. (Eds.) (2005). Handbook of wisdom: Psychological perspectives. New York: Cambridge University Press.
A first handbook on wisdom.

Grigorenko, E. L., Sternberg, R. J., Jukes, M., Alcock, K., Lambo, J., Ngorosho, D., Nokes, C., & Bundy, D. A. (2006). Effects of antiparasitic treatment on dynamically and statically tested cognitive skills over time. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 27 (6), 499-526.
A practical demonstration of the value of dynamic testing.

Grigorenko, E. L., Sternberg, R. J., & Strauss, S. (2006). Practical intelligence and elementary-school teacher effectiveness in the United States and Israel: Measuring the predictive power of tacit knowledge. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 1, 14–33.
Shows how practical intelligence makes a difference in teaching.

Hedlund, J., Wilt, J. M., Nebel, K. R., Ashford, S. J., & Sternberg, R. J. (2006). Assessing practical intelligence in business school admissions: A supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test. Learning and Individual Differences, 16, 101–127.
Shows the value of measuring practical intelligence for business for business-school admissions.

Stemler, S. E., Grigorenko, E. L., Jarvin, L., & Sternberg, R. J. (2006). Using the theory of successful intelligence as a basis for augmenting AP exams in psychology and statistics. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 31(2), 344–376.

Stemler, S., Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L., Jarvin, L., & Sharpes, D. K. (2009). Using the theory of successful intelligence as a framework for developing assessments in AP Physics. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 34, 195-209.
Show how the triarchic theory could be used for assessment in the Advanced Placement program.

Sternberg, R.J. (2006).  A duplex theory of love.  In R. J. Sternberg & K. Weis (Eds.), The new psychology of love (pp. 184–199).  New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
My first presentation of the duplex theory of love.

Sternberg, R. J., & The Rainbow Project Collaborators (2006). The Rainbow Project: Enhancing the SAT through assessments of analytical, practical and creative skills. Intelligence, 34 (4), 321-350.
The original presentation of the Rainbow Project data from my last major empirical project during my time as a professor at Yale.

Rate, C.R., Clarke, J.A., Lindsay, D.R., & Sternberg, R.J. (2007). Implicit theories of courage. Journal of Positive Psychology, 2 (2), 80-98.
A study of courage, which is so understudied in psychology.

Sternberg, R. J. (2007). A systems model of leadership: WICS. American Psychologist, 62 (1), 34-42.
An analysis of WICS as a systems models of leadership.

Sternberg, R. J., Lipka, J., Newman, T., Wildfeuer, S., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2007). Triarchically-based instruction and assessment of sixth-grade mathematics in a Yup’ik cultural setting in Alaska. International Journal of Giftedness and Creativity, 21 (2), 6-19.
Shows the value of triarchic teaching in an indigneous group.

Sternberg, R. J., Reznitskaya, A. & Jarvin, L. (2007). Teaching for wisdom: What matters is not just what students know, but how they use it. The London Review of Education, 5 (2), 143-158. 
A fairly extensive analysis of the value of teaching for wisdom.

Sternberg, R. J. (2008).  Assessing students for medical school admissions: Is it time for a new approach? Academic Medicine, 83 (10), October Supplement, S105-S109.
Arguing for the importance of assessing medical applicants more broadly.

Sternberg, R. J. (2008). The WICS approach to leadership: Stories of leadership and the structures and processes that support them. The Leadership Quarterly, 19 (3), 360-371.
Shows the importance of stories in leadership.

Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L., & Zhang, L.-F. (2008). Styles of learning and thinking matter in instruction and assessment. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3 (6), 486-506.
A widely ignored paper on the importance of thinking and learning styles for schooling.

Sternberg, R. J., & Sternberg, K. (2008).  The nature of hate.  New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first written book, with Karin Sternberg, on hate.

Grigorenko, E. L., Jarvin, L., Diffley, R., Goodyear, J., Shanahan, E. J., & Sternberg, R. J. (2009). Are SSATs and GPA enough? A theory-based approach to predicting academic success in high school. Journal of Educational Psychology, 101, 964-981.
Shows how it is possible to devise measures of tacit knowledge as supplementary measures for admission to private schools.

Sternberg, R. J. (2009). The Rainbow and Kaleidoscope Projects: A new psychological approach to undergraduate admissions. European Psychologist, 14, 279-287.
A report that integrates the results of the Rainbow and Kaleidoscope Projects on college admissions.

Sternberg, R. J. (2009).  We need to teach for ethical conduct. The Educational Forum, 73 (3), 190-198.
A process-based model of ethical reasoning.

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1972-1999

Sternberg, R. J. (1972). A decision rule to facilitate the undergraduate admissions process. College and University, 48, 48–53.
My very first publication.

Sternberg, R. J., & Bower, G. H. (1974). Transfer in part–whole and whole–part free recall: A comparative evaluation of theories. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 13, 1–26.
The only publication I ever did that actually solved a problem definitively.

Sternberg, R. J. (1977). Component processes in analogical reasoning. Psychological Review, 84, 353–378.
The article based on my dissertation.  It applied componential analysis to analogical reasoning. 

Sternberg, R. J. (1977). Intelligence, information processing, and analogical reasoning: The componential analysis of human abilities. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
The book based on my dissertation. It introduced componential analysis.

Sternberg, R. J. (1979). The nature of mental abilities. American Psychologist, 34, 214–230.
My first attempt to write for a general psychological audience.

Sternberg, R. J., & Rifkin, B. (1979). The development of analogical reasoning processes. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 27, 195–232.
My first article in developmental psychology.

Sternberg, R. J. (1980). Sketch of a componential subtheory of human intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 3, 573–584.
My first attempt to sketch out comprehensively the componential account of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1980). Representation and process in linear syllogistic reasoning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 109, 119–159.
My first systematic application of componential analysis to deductive reasoning.

Sternberg, R. J., & Weil, E. M. (1980). An aptitude–strategy interaction in linear syllogistic reasoning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 72, 226–234.
My first systematic attempt to show that there are salient and consequential individual differences in how people solve reasoning problems.

Guyote, M. J., & Sternberg, R. J. (1981). A transitive-chain theory of syllogistic reasoning. Cognitive Psychology, 13, 461–525.
An attempt to provide a theory of syllogistic reasoning.

Schustack, M. W., & Sternberg, R. J. (1981). Evaluation of evidence in causal inference. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 110, 101–120.
My first paper on causal inference.

Sternberg, R. J., Conway, B. E., Ketron, J. L., & Bernstein, M. (1981). People’s conceptions of intelligence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 41, 37–55.
My first study of implicit theories of intelligence.

Tourangeau, R., & Sternberg, R. J. (1981). Aptness in metaphor. Cognitive Psychology, 13, 27–55.
My first attempt to study metaphorical reasoning.

Detterman, D. K., & Sternberg, R. J. (Eds.). (1982). How and how much can intelligence be increased?Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
My first attempt to get scholars collectively to show that intelligence modifiable.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (1982). Handbook of human intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first edited handbook. The start of a 40-year relationship with Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R. J. (1982). Natural, unnatural, and supernatural concepts. Cognitive Psychology, 14, 451–488.
My first paper on the new riddle of induction and thinking beyond conventional inductive reasoning.

Sternberg, R. J., & Davidson, J. E. (1982, June). The mind of the puzzler. Psychology Today, 16, 37–44.
My first attempt to apply componential analysis to insightful problem solving.

Sternberg, R. J., & Gardner, M. K. (1982). A componential interpretation of the general factor in human intelligence. In H. J. Eysenck (Ed.), A model for intelligence (pp. 231–254). Berlin: Springer–Verlag.
My first attempt to explain the general factor of intelligence in terms of information-processing components of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Wagner, R. K. (1982, July). Automatization failure in learning disabilities. Topics in learning and learning disabilities, 2, 1–11.
My first attempt to study learning disabilities.

Sternberg, R. J. (1983). Components of human intelligence. Cognition, 15, 1–48.

Sternberg, R. J., & Gardner, M. K. (1983). Unities in inductive reasoning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 112, 80–116.
My attempts to apply the componential theory to all inductive-reasoning problems—a componential account of fluid intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). A contextualist view of the nature of intelligence. International Journal of Psychology, 19, 307–334.
My first attempt to apply a contextualist approach to human intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). How can we teach intelligence? Educational Leadership, 42, 38–50.
My first attempt to write for an audience of educators about teaching intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). A theory of knowledge acquisition in the development of verbal concepts. Developmental Review, 4, 113–138.
My attempt to apply componential analysis to crystallized intelligence—vocabulary acquisition, in particular.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grajek, S. (1984). The nature of love. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47, 312–329.
My first publication on love.

Sternberg, R. J. (1984). Toward a triarchic theory of human intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 7, 269–287.

Berg, C. A., & Sternberg, R. J. (1985). A triarchic theory of intellectual development during adulthood. Developmental Review, 5, 334–370.
My first article on adult intellectual development.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Beyond IQ: A triarchic theory of human intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first publications on the triarchic theory of human intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Implicit theories of intelligence, creativity, and wisdom. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49(3), 607–627.
My first comprehensive paper on implicit theories in relation to higher processes.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Human intelligence: The model is the message. Science, 230, 1111–1118.

Sternberg, R. J. (1990). Metaphors of mind: Conceptions of the nature of intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first attempts to understand the metaphors underlying the study of human intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Teaching critical thinking, Part 1: Are we making critical mistakes? Phi Delta Kappan, 67, 194–198.

Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Teaching critical thinking, Part 2: Possible solutions. Phi Delta Kappan, 67, 277–280.
My first papers on teaching for critical thinking.

Sternberg, R. J., & Barnes, M. (1985). Real and ideal others in romantic relationships: Is four a crowd? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 1586–1608.
My first recognition of the importance of ideals in love relationships.

Sternberg, R. J., & Soriano, L. J. (1984). Styles of conflict resolution. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47, 115–126.
My first article on conflict resolution.

Sternberg, R. J., & Smith, C. (1985). Social intelligence and decoding skills in nonverbal communication. Social Cognition, 2, 168–192.
My first paper on social intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Spear, L. C. (1985). A triarchic theory of mental retardation. In N. Ellis & N. Bray (Eds.), International review of research in mental retardation (Vol. 13, pp. 301–326). New York: Academic Press.
My first article on general intellectual disability, then called “mental retardation.”

Wagner, R. K., & Sternberg, R. J. (1985). Practical intelligence in real-world pursuits: The role of tacit knowledge. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 49, 436–458.
My first article on practical intelligence. Rick Wagner and I collaborated for many years.

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). Inside intelligence. American Scientist, 74, 137–143.
An early attempt to explain my views on intelligence for all scientists, not just behavioral scientists.  

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). Intelligence applied: Understanding and increasing your intellectual skills. San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
The result of our Venezuela project. My first attempt to write on how to improve one’s intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). Intelligence, wisdom, and creativity: Three is better than one. Educational Psychologist, 21, 175–190.
My first paper linking intelligence, wisdom, and creativity.

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). Toward a unified theory of human reasoning. Intelligence, 10, 281–315.
My first serious attempt to present a unified theory of human reasoning.

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). A triangular theory of love. Psychological Review, 93, 119–135.
My first presentation of the triangular theory of love. 

Sternberg, R. J. (1986). A triarchic theory of intellectual giftedness. In R. J. Sternberg & J. E. Davidson (Eds.), Conceptions of giftedness (pp. 223–243). New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first attempt to apply the triarchic theory to intellectual giftednesss.

Sternberg, R. J., & Detterman, D. K. (Eds.) (1986). What is intelligence? Norwood, N.J.: Ablex Publishing Corporation.
An attempt to update the famous 1921 Journal of Educational Psychology symposium on the nature of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Suben, J. (1986). The socialization of intelligence. In M. Perlmutter (Ed.), Perspectives on intellectual development: Vol. 19. Minnesota symposia on child psychology (pp. 201–235). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
My first paper arguing that intelligence is, in large part, socialized.

Sternberg, R. J. (1987). Liking versus loving: A comparative evaluation of theories. Psychological Bulletin, 102, 331–345.
My first synthetic paper on loving and liking.

Sternberg, R. J. (1987). The psychology of verbal comprehension. In R. Glaser (Ed.), Advances in instructional psychology (Vol. 3, pp. 97–151). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
My first fully integrative attempt to apply my theory of intelligence to verbal comprehension (crystallized ability).

Sternberg, R. J. (1987). Second game: A school’s-eye view of intelligence. In J. A. Langer (Ed.), Language, literacy, and culture: Issues of society and schooling (pp. 23–48). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
My first attempt fully to account for how schools affect not only intelligence, but also, what intelligence is.

Sternberg, R. J., & Dobson, D. M. (1987). Resolving interpersonal conflicts: An analysis of stylistic consistency. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 794–812.
My second and last attempt to study conflict resolution.  This work has now become integral to current work on adaptive intelligence and wisdom.

Kalmar, D. A., & Sternberg, R. J. (1988). Theory knitting: An integrative approach to theory development. Philosophical Psychology, 1, 153–170.
An attempt to discuss how theories can be knitted together so that the whole is more than the sum of its parts. Later became “synthesis” in the propulsion theory of creative contributions.

Sincoff, J. B., & Sternberg, R. J. (1988). The development of verbal fluency abilities and strategies in elementary–school–aged children. Developmental Psychology, 24, 646–653.
My one and only empirical attempt to study verbal fluency.

Spear, L. C., & Sternberg, R. J. (1987). Teaching styles: Staff development for teaching thinking. Journal of Staff Development, 8(3), 35–39.
An attempt to show that the way most teaching is done does not optimize learning.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). Mental self-government: A theory of intellectual styles and their development. Human Development, 31(4), 197–224.
My first paper introducing my theory of mental self-government.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). The psychologist’s companion (2nd ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first serious attempt to write a book on writing in psychology.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). A three-facet model of creativity. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), The nature of creativity (pp. 125–147). New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first explicit theory of creativity.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). The triangle of love. New York: Basic.
My first trade book on love.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). The triarchic mind: A new theory of human intelligence. New York: Viking.
My first trade book on intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1988). A triarchic view of intelligence in cross–cultural perspective. In S. H. Irvine, & J. W. Berry (Eds.), Human abilities in cultural context (pp. 60–85). New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first attempt to apply the triarchic theory of intelligence across cultures.

Williams, W. M., & Sternberg, R. J. (1988). Group intelligence: Why some groups are better than others. Intelligence, 12, 351–377.
My first attempt to understand group intelligence.

Frensch, P. A., & Sternberg, R. J. (1989). Expertise and intelligent thinking: When is it worse to know better? In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Advances in the psychology of human intelligence (Vol. 5, pp. 157–188). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
A paper I have cited many times showing that when novel conditions are introduced, experts are often hurt more than novices—that is, experts are subject to entrenchment.

Sternberg, R. J. (1989). Domain-generality versus domain-specificity: The life and impending death of a false dichotomy. Merrill–Palmer Quarterly, 35, 115–130.
My first discussion of domain-generality vs. domain-specificity as a false dichotomy.

Sternberg, R. J., & Gastel, J. (1989). Coping with novelty in human intelligence: An empirical investigation. Intelligence, 13, 187–197.

Sternberg, R. J., & Gastel, J. (1989). If dancers ate their shoes: Inductive reasoning with factual and counterfactual premises. Memory and Cognition, 17, 1–10.
My attempts to extend work I had done on counterfactual reasoning and intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1990). Metaphors of mind: Conceptions of the nature of intelligence. New York: Cambridge University Press.
An expansion of my earlier Science article on the metaphors of mind that underlie our thinking about intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1990). Wisdom and its relations to intelligence and creativity. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Wisdom: Its nature, origins, and development (pp. 142–159). New York: Cambridge University Press.
An early attempt to relate wisdom to intelligence and creativity.

Sternberg, R. J., Okagaki, L., & Jackson, A. (1990). Practical intelligence for success in school. Educational Leadership, 48, 35–39.
The first report of a program to teach practical intelligence for school.

Kolligian, J., Jr., & Sternberg, R. J. (1991). Perceived fraudulence in young adults: Is there an “imposter syndrome”? Journal of Personality Assessment, 56 (2), 308–326.
My single paper on the impostor syndrome.

Sternberg, R. J. (1991). Love the way you want it. New York: Bantam.
My first attempt at a mass-market paperback.

Sternberg, R. J. (1991). Triarchic abilities test. In D. Dickinson (Ed.), Creating the future: Perspectives on educational change (pp. 76–81). Aston Clinton, Bucks, UK: Accelerated Learning Systems.
A report on my first attempt to create a triarchic intelligence test.

Sternberg, R. J., & Lubart, T. I. (1991). An investment theory of creativity and its development. Human Development, 34(1), 1–31.
My first paper on the investment theory of creativity.

Wagner, R. K., & Sternberg, R. J. (1991). Tacit knowledge inventory for managers. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.  
Wagner’s and my attempt to create a test of practical intelligence for managers. My first published test.

Berg, C. A., & Sternberg, R. J. (1992). Adults’ conceptions of intelligence across the adult life span. Psychology and Aging, 7(2), 221–231.
An attempt to understand how adults think about changes in intelligence over the life span.

Okagaki, L., & Sternberg, R. J. (1993). Parental beliefs and children’s school performance. Child Development, 64(1), 36–56.
Our first study on how parental beliefs about intelligence affect the way intelligence is socialized in children of different ethnic groups.

Sternberg, R. J., & Wagner, R. K. (1993). The g–ocentric view of intelligence and job performance is wrong. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 2(1), 1–4
An article in which we tried to show there is much more to job performance than g.  I am proud to say that the g theorists were immediately all over the article.  

Williams, W. M., Sternberg, R. J., Rashotte, C. A., & Wagner, R. K. (1993). Assessing the value of cooperative education. Journal of Cooperative Education, 28(2), 32–55.
An article in which we argued for cooperative education, whereby students learn both in the classroom and in practical work settings.

Sternberg, R. J. (1994). Answering questions and questioning answers. Phi Delta Kappan, 76 (2), 136–138.
The first piece I wrote pointing out that asking good questions is more important than answering trivial questions.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (1994). Encyclopedia of human intelligence. New York: Macmillan.
An attempt to systematize in encyclopedic form almost all we knew at the time about intelligence.

Beall A. E., & Sternberg, R. J. (1995). The social construction of love. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12(3), 417–438.
A first paper, at least for me, arguging that love is largely socially constructed.

Sternberg, R. J. (1995). For whom does the bell curve toll? It tolls for you. Washington, DC: EdPress. 

Sternberg, R. J. (1995). For whom the bell curve tolls: A review of The bell curve. Psychological Science, 6(5), 257–261. 

Sternberg, R. J., Callahan, C., Burns, D., Gubbins, E. J., Purcell, J., Reis, S. M., Renzulli, J. S., & Westberg, K. (1995). Return gift to sender: A review of The bell curve, by Richard Herrnstein & Charles Murray. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39(3), 177–179. 
Reviews of The Bell Curve, which I believe to be one of the more backward-looking books that have been published on intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1995). In search of the human mind. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
My first introductory-psychology text, based on the triarchic theory of intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J. (1995). Love as a story. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 12 (4), 541–546.
An early presentation of the theory of love as a story.

Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L. (1995). Styles of thinking in school. European Journal for High Ability, 6(2), 201–219.
Our most exhaustive empirical analysis of the theory of mental self-government.

Sternberg, R. J., & Lubart, T. I. (1995). Defying the crowd: Cultivating creativity in a culture of conformity. New York: Free Press.
Our first comprehensive presentation of the investment theory of creativity.

Sternberg, R. J., Wagner, R. K., Williams, W. M., & Horvath, J. A. (1995). Testing common sense. American Psychologist, 50(11), 912–927. 
A presentation of our work on practical intelligence for a general audience.

Sternberg, R. J., & Zhang, L. F. (1995). What do we mean by “giftedness”? A pentagonal implicit theory. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39(2), 88–94.
Our first presentation of the pentagonal implicit theory of giftedness.

Spear-Swerling, L., & Sternberg, R. J. (1996). Off track: When poor readers become learning disabled. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
An attempt to present a systematic account of learning disabilities. 

Sternberg, R. J. (1996). Cognitive psychology. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
The first edition of my cognitive-psychology textbook.

Sternberg, R. J. (1996). Myths, countermyths, and truths about human intelligence. Educational Researcher, 25(2), 11–16.
An attempt to dispel myths about intelligence—I’m still working at it. It’s definitely a work in progress.

Sternberg, R. J. (1996). Successful intelligence. New York: Simon & Schuster. [hardback]

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (1997). Career paths in psychology: Where your degree can take you. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 
My first attempt to edit a book on career paths for students who pursue psychology.

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Construct validation of a triangular love scale. European Journal of Social Psychology , 27(3), 313–335.
An empirical validation of the triangular theory of love.

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Fads in psychology: What we can do. APA Monitor, 28(7), 19.
My first essay about the domination of fads in psychology.  It’s all still true today.

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Successful intelligence. New York: Plume. [paperback]
My major work on successful intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (1996). How to develop student creativity. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
My first book on teaching for creativity.

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Thinking styles. New York: Cambridge University Press.
My major work on thinking styles.

Sternberg, R. J., & Kalmar D.A. (1997). When will the milk spoil? Everyday induction in human intelligence. Intelligence, 25(3), 185–203.
An attempt better to understand induction in everyday life.

Sternberg, R. J., Powell, C., McGrane, P. A., & McGregor, S. (1997). Effects of a parasitic infection on cognitive functioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 3, 67–76.
Our first empirical article on effects of parasitic illnesses on intelligence

Sternberg, R. J., & Williams, W. M. (1997). Does the Graduate Record Examination predict meaningful success in the graduate training of psychologists? A case study. American Psychologist, 52, 630–641.
A controversial article arguing that the GRE is worth much less than many people think.  The ETS aficionados were all over this one.

Yang, S., & Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Conceptions of intelligence in ancient Chinese philosophy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 17, 101–119.

Yang, S., & Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Taiwanese Chinese people’s conceptions of intelligence. Intelligence, 25, 21–36.
Two attempts to understand intelligence from an Eastern perspective.

Grigorenko, E. L., & Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Dynamic testing. Psychological Bulletin, 124, 75–111.
Our first major article on the value of dynamic testing.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Abilities are forms of developing expertise. Educational Researcher, 27(3), 11–20.

Sternberg, R. J. (1999). Intelligence as developing expertise. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 24, 359–375.
My first articles arguing that intelligence is a form of developing expertise.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). All intelligence testing is “cross-cultural.” In R. J. Samuda et al. (Eds.), Advances in cross-cultural assessment (pp. 197–215; 274–285). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 
My first article arguing that all intelligence is cultural, no matter how culture-fair or even culture-free it may seem to be.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998) A balance theory of wisdom. Review of General Psychology, 2, 347-365.
My first article on the balance theory of wisdom.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Costs and benefits of defying the crowd in science. Intelligence, 26, 209–215.
An article pointing out how, in 1998, intelligence investigators “followed the crowd.” They still do. 

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Cupid’s arrow: The course of love through time. New York: Cambridge University Press.
A systematic presentation of the triangular theory of love.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Love is a story. New York: Oxford University Press.
A systematic presentation of the theory of love as a story.

Sternberg, R. J. (1998). Principles of teaching for successful intelligence. Educational Psychologist, 33, 65–72.
An attempt to systematize teaching for successful intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., Torff, B., & Grigorenko, E. L. (1998). Teaching triarchically improves school achievement. Journal of Educational Psychology, 90, 374–384.
An early study showing that teaching for successful intelligence can be successful in academic settings.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.). (1999) Handbook of creativity. New York: Cambridge University Press.
My first handbook of creativity with Cambridge.

Sternberg, R. J. (1999). A propulsion model of types of creative contributions. Review of General Psychology, 3, 83–100.
My first presentation of the propulsion model of creative contributions.

Sternberg, R. J. (1999). The theory of successful intelligence. Review of General Psychology, 3, 292–316.
A presentation of the theory of successful intelligence.

Sternberg, R. J., & Grigorenko, E. L. (1999). Our labeled children: What every parent and teacher needs to know about learning disabilities. Reading, MA: Perseus Publishing Group.
Our attempt to show the risks of labeling in identifying children with learning and other disabilities.

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