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Sharon

Sassler

Professor, and Director of Undergraduate Studies
1302A Martha Van Rensselaer Hall
Ithaca, New York
Policy Analysis and Management
Phone

Biography

 Sharon Sassler received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Brown University in 1995, and joined the Cornell faculty in 2005.  She is a professor in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management.  A social demographer, Sassler’s research examines factors shaping the activities of young adults and their life course transitions into school and work, relationships, and parenthood, and how these transitions vary by gender, race/ethnicity, and social class. 

Her published research on family demography explores various facets of contemporary relationships, assessing whether marital or cohabiting unions are associated with the health of single mothers; how children born to unmarried parents fare; as well as research on how cohabiting unions progress into marriage, parenthood, or dissolution.   Her recently published (2017) book, Cohabitation Nation: Gender, Class, and the Remaking of Relationships, examines how cohabitation is contributing to growing levels of family inequality in the United States; it won the Goode Book Award from the Family Section of the American Sociological Association in 2018.  A second stream of her work examines the retention and advancement of women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) occupations, examining transitions into and retention in STEM jobs, as well as the gender wage gap in STEM.   

Sassler has published extensively on topics relating to family formation and change, including studies of the progression of romantic and sexual relationships, union formation (cohabitation, marriage), transitions into parenthood, and how couples negotiate paid work, domestic labor, and contraceptive use.  Her recent research projects on family demography explore how the tempo of romantic and sexual relationship progression is associated with union outcomes, how low- to moderate-income families arrange paid work and domestic work and the association with sexual frequency, relationship quality, and joint investments. She also explores the occupational choices of women and men who majored in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics), exploring how family expectations, attitudes, and behaviors differentiates the occupational choice and retention of women and men. 

Sassler currently has several grant-funded projects. One, in conjunction with fellow PAM faculty member Laura Tach (and several graduate students) is examining how neighborhood factors – housing costs, local job market attributes – are associated with the tempo of relationship progression.  A second is a 5-year NSF funded grant that follows STEM graduates prospectively for five years, assessing the factors determining transitions into and retention in STEM occupations.  Her third funded project explores how the representation of various groups (women, racial minorities, foreign-born STEM professionals) shapes transitions into and retention in STEM jobs, as well as the occupational choices of those who leave STEM fields.

Book Authored

Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. 2017 Cohabitation Nation? Gender, Class, and the Remaking of Relationships. University of California Press.

 

Book Chapter

1. Frances K. Goldscheider and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, May 2018. “Class and the Gender Revolution.” In Naomi R. Cahn, June Rose Carbone, Laurie F. DeRose, and W. Bradford Wilcox (Editors), Family Inequality in Europe and the Americas: Causes and Consequences. Cambridge University Press.

2. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. 2017. “Waiting to Be Asked: Gender, Power, and Relationship Progression among Cohabiting Couples.” Chapter 8 (pp. 79-88) in Constance L. Shehan (Ed), The Family Issues Reader. Sage.

3. Frances K. Goldscheider and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, May 2018. “Class and the Gender Revolution.”Pp. 199-215 In Naomi R. Cahn, June Rose Carbone, Laurie F. DeRose, and W. Bradford Wilcox (Editors), Family Inequality in Europe and the Americas: Causes and Consequences. Cambridge University Press.

 

Journal Article Non-Refereed

1. Sassler, Sharon. 2006. “Cohabitation.” Encyclopedia of Sociology, edited by George Ritzer. Oxford: Blackwell Pulishing Ltd.

2. Sassler, Sharon. 2006. “Cohabitation.” Encyclopedia of Sociology, edited by George Ritzer. Oxford: Blackwell Pulishing Ltd.

3. Sassler, Sharon. 2007. “Cohabitation.” Encyclopedia of Sociology, edited by George Ritzer. Vol. II, pp. 565-569. Oxford: Blackwell Pulishing Ltd.

4. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. Forthcoming. “Class Differences in Women’s Family and Work Behaviors.” Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice.

 

Journal Article Refereed

1. Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, and Elizabeth Hartmann. 2010. "The Tempo of Relationship Progression among Low-Income Couples." Social Science Research, 39(5):831-844.

2. Fenaba Addo and Sharon Sassler.2010. “Financial Arrangements and Relationship Quality Among Low-Income Couples.” Family Relations, 59:408-423.

3. Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. 2010. "Stability and Change in the Division of Labor amongCohabiting Couples." Sociological Forum, 25(4):677-701.

4. Daniel T. Lichter, Richard N. Turner, and Sharon Sassler. 2010. “National Estimates of the Rise in Serial Cohabitation.” Social Science Research. 39(5):754-765.

5. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. Forthcoming,April 2011."Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes." Family Relations, 60(2):163-177. (DOI: 10.111/j.1741-3729.2010.00640.x).

6. Sharon Sassler and Kara Joyner. Forthcoming. “Social Exchange and the Progression of Sexual Relationships in Emerging Adulthood.” Social Forces.

7. Sharon Sassler. 2010. "Partnering Across the Life Course: Sex, Relationships, and Mate Selection." Journal of Marriage and Family.Decade in Review Issue. 72(3):557-575.

8. Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. (Forthcoming, September 2012). “The Construction of Gender in Cohabiting Relationships.” Qualitative Sociology.

9. Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, and Daniel T. Lichter. “The Tempo of Sexual Activity and Later Relationship Quality.” Revise and Resubmit.

10. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. “The Missing Women in STEM? Accounting for Gender Differences in Entrance into STEM Occupations.”

11. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo, and Elizabeth Cooksey. “Mother’s Union History and the Health of Children Born to Single Mothers.”

12. Sharon Sassler, Kristi Williams, Fenaba Addo, and Adrianne Frech. “Family Structure & High School Graduation: How Children Born to Unwed Mothers Fare.”

13. Sharon Sassler and Amanda J. Miller. 2011. “Waiting to Be Asked: Gender, Power, and Relationship Progression among Cohabiting Couples.” Journal of Family Issues, 32(4):482-506.

14. Sharon Sassler and Amanda J. Miller. 2011. “Class Differences in Cohabitation Processes.” Family Relations, 60(2):163-177.

15. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo,* and Elizabeth Cooksey. 2011. “Single Mothers, Union History, and Health at Midlife.” American Sociological Review 76(3):465-486.

16. Sharon Sassler and Kara Joyner. 2011. “Social Exchange and the Progression of Sexual Relationships in Emerging Adulthood.” Social Forces. 90(1):223-245.

17. Amanda J. Miller, Sharon Sassler, and Dela Kus-Appouh.* 2011. “The Specter of Divorce: Views from Working- and Middle-Class Cohabitors.” Family Relations, 60(5):602-616.

18 Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. 2012. “The Construction of Gender in Cohabiting Relationships.” Qualitative Sociology, 35(4):427-446.

19. Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, and Daniel T. Lichter. 2012. “The Tempo of Sexual Activity and Later Relationship Quality.” Journal of Marriage and Family, 74:708-725.

20. Jennifer Glass, Yael Levitte, Sharon Sassler, and Katherine Michelmore. “What’s the Matter with STEM? A Comparison of Women’s STEM and Professional Occupational Trajectories.”

21. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo, and Elizabeth Cooksey. “Mother’s Union History and the Health of Children Born to Single Mothers.”

22. Sharon Sassler, Soma Roy, and Elizabeth Stasny. “Men’s Economic Status and Marital Transitions of Fragile Families.”

23. Sharon Sassler, Kristi Williams, Fenaba Addo, and Adrianne Frech. “Family Structure & High School Graduation: How Children Born to Unwed Mothers Fare.”

24. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. “The Ecology of Relationships: The Effect of Meeting Patterns on Cohabiting Couples’ Relationship Progression.”

25. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. “Meritocracy or Gendered Workplace? Explaining Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.”

26. Jessica Su, Sharon Sassler, and Rachel Dunifon. “Better for Baby? Premarital Conceptions, Shotgun Marriage, and Child Well-Being among Children Born to Teen Mothers.”

27. Jennifer Glass, Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, and Katherine Michelmore. 2013. “What’s So Special About STEM? A Comparison of Women’s Retention in STEM and Professional Occupations.” Social Forces. 92(2):723-756.

28. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo, and Elizabeth Cooksey. 2013. “Mothers’ Union Histories and the Mental & Physical Health of Adolescents Born to Unmarried Mothers.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 54 (3): 278-295.

29. Sharon Sassler, Anna Cunningham, and Daniel T. Lichter. Forthcoming. “Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Marital Quality.” Journal of Family Issues.

30. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, and Lisa Nicholson. Forthcoming, March 2008. “For Better or For Worse? The Consequences of Marriage and Cohabitation for the Health and Well-Being of Single Mothers.” Social Forces

31. Sharon Sassler, Amanda Miller, and Sarah Malackany. Forthcoming. “Planned Parenthood? A Prospective Exploration of Cohabitors’ Childbearing Plans.” Journal of Family Issues.

32. Leanna Mellott and Sharon Sassler. “The Impact of Female Headship on Working Daughters’ Occupational Attainment: A Re-Examination of the Disadvantage Hypothesis.” Research in Social Stratificaiton and Mobility. 25:73-88.

33. Sharon Sassler, Desiree Ciambrone, and Gaelan Benway. “The Negotiation of Adulthood Among Young Adults Who Return Home.” Sociological Forum.

34. Sharon Sassler and Anna Cunningham. Forthcoming, Spring 2008. “Cohabitation and Childbearing Desires: Does Marriage Matter?” Sociological Perspectives. 51(1):

35. Frances Goldscheider, Gayle Kaufman, and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming. “Navigating the “New” Market: How Attitudes Towards Partner Characteristics Shape Union Formation.” Journal of Family Issues.

36. Sharon Sassler and Anna Cunningham. Forthcoming. “Cohabitation and Childbearing Desires: Does Marriage Matter?” Sociological Perspectives.

37. Peter Tuckel, Sharon Sassler, Richard Maisel, and Andrew Leykam. 2006. “A GIS-Based Analysis of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 in One American City.” Social Science History 30:167-96.

38. Leanna Mellott and Sharon Sassler. “The Impact of Female Headship on Working Daughters’ Occupational Attainment: A Re-Examination of the Disadvantage Hypothesis.” Research in Social Stratificaiton and Mobility.

39. Frances Goldscheider and Sharon Sassler. 2006. “Creating Step-Families: Integrating Children into the Study of Step-Family Formation.” Journal of Marriage and Family. 68:1-17.

40. Sharon Sassler. 2006. “School Participation of Immigrant Youth in the Early 20th Century: Integration or Segmented Assimilation?” Sociology of Education. 79(1):1-24 (lead article).  

41. Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming 2006. “School Participation of Immigrant Youth in the Early 20th Century: Integration or Segmented Assimilation?” Sociology of Education. 79(1).  

42. Sassler, Sharon. 2005. “Gender & Ethnic Differences in Marital Assimilation in the Early 20th Century.” International Migration Review 39(3):608-636.

43. Peter Tuckel, Sharon Sassler, Richard Maisel, and Andrew Leykam. Forthcoming, 2006. “A GIS-Based Analysis of the Influenza Epidemic of 1918 in One American City.” Social Science History 29.  

44. Frances Goldscheider and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming. “Creating Step-Families: Integrating Children into the Study of Step-Family Formation.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

45. Katherine Michelmore and Sharon Sassler. “Explaining the Gender Gap in Earnings in STEM: Does Group Size Matter?”

46. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. 2015. “The Ecology of Relationships: The Effect of Meeting Patterns on Cohabiting Couples’ Relationship Progression.” Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 32(2): 141-160.

47. Jessica Su, Rachel Dunifon, and Sharon Sassler. 2015. “Better for Baby?The Retreat from Mid-Pregnancy Marriage and Implications for Parenting and Child Well-Being. Demography. 52(4): 1167-1194.

48. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, and Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo. 2015. “Early Childbearing, Union Status, and Women’s Health at Midlife.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior.56(4):514-533.      

49. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Jennifer Holland. Forthcoming.“The Progression of Sexual Relationships.” Journal of Marriage and Family.  

50. Daniel Carlson, Amanda Miller, Sharon Sassler, and Sarah Hanson. Forthcoming. “The Gendered Division of Housework and Couples’ Sexual Relationships: A Re-Examination.” Journal of Marriage and Family.

51. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Zhenchao Qian. “Drifting, Sliding, or Plummeting? Transitions into Cohabitation and Beyond.”

52. Daniel T. Lichter, Katherine Michelmore, Richard Turner, and Sharon Sassler. “Pathways to a Stable Marriage? Pregnancy and Childbearing among Cohabiting Couples.”

53. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. “The Missing Women in STEM? Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.”

54. Fenaba Addo, Sharon Sassler, and Kristi Williams. “Maternal Union Status and Youth Educational Attainment: Does Age at Birth Matter?” Revise and Resubmit.

55. Sharon Sassler. “Was Attainment of the American Dream Gendered? The Occupational Attainment of Sons and Daughters in the Early 20th Century.” Revise and Resubmit.

56. Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. “Don’t Force My Hand”: Gender & Social Class Variation in Relationship Negotiation. Revise and Resubmit.

57. Sharon Sassler, Desiree Ciambrone, and Gaelan Benway. 2008. “Are they Really Mama’s Boys / Daddy’s Girls? The Negotiation of Adulthood among Young Adults Who Return Home.” Sociological Forum 23(4):670-698.

58. Sharon Sassler and Anna Cunningham. 2008. “Cohabitation and Childbearing Desires: Does Marriage Matter?” Sociological Perspectives. 51(1): 3-28.

59. Sharon Sassler, Anna Cunningham, and Daniel T. Lichter. Forthcoming. “Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Marital Quality.” Journal of Family Issues.

60. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, and Lisa Nicholson. 2008. “For Better or For Worse? The Consequences of Marriage and Cohabitation for the Health and Well-Being of Single Mothers.” Social Forces 86(4): 1481–1511.

61. Frances Goldscheider, Gayle Kaufman, and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, 2009. “Navigating the “New” Market: How Attitudes Towards Partner Characteristics Shape Union Formation.” Journal of Family Issues.

62. Sharon Sassler, Amanda Miller, and Sarah Favinger. 2009. “Planned Parenthood? Fertility Intentions and Experiences among Cohabiting Couples.” Journal of Family Issues. 30:206-232.

63. Frances Goldscheider, Gayle Kaufman, and Sharon Sassler. 2009. “Navigating the “New” Market: How Attitudes Towards Partner Characteristics Shape Union Formation.” Journal of Family Issues.30: 719-737.

64. Daniel T. Lichter, Richard N. Turner, and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, 2010. “National Estimates of the Rise in Serial Cohabitation.” Social Science Research.

65. Sharon Sassler, Anna Cunningham, and Daniel T. Lichter. Forthcoming. “Intergenerational Patterns of Union Formation and Marital Quality.” Journal of Family Issues. 30: 757-786.

66. Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, 2010. "Partnering Across the Life Course: Sex, Relationships, and Mate Selection." Journal of Marriage and Family.Decade in Review Issue.

67. Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. "Stability and Change in the Division of Labor among Working-Class Cohabiting Couples: A Qualitative Analysis." Forthcoming. Sociological Forum.

68. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller. Forthcoming, 2010. “Class Differences in Women’s Family and Work Behaviors.” Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice.

69. Sharon Sassler, Amanda Miller, and Sarah Favinger. 2009. “Planned Parenthood? Fertility Intentions and Experiences among Cohabiting Couples.” Journal of Family Issues. 30:206-232.

70. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miller: Forthcoming. “Waiting to Be Asked: Gender, Power, and Relationship Progression among Cohabiting Couples.” Journal of Family Issues. DOI:10.1177/0192513X10391045.

71. Sharon Sassler, Kristi Williams, Fenaba Addo, Adrianne Frech, and Elizabeth Cooksey. 2013. “Family Structure & High School Graduation: How Children Born to Unmarried Mothers Fare.” Genus: Journal of Population Sciences, Vol. LXIX (No. 2), 1-33.

72. Sharon Sassler, Soma Roy, and Elizabeth Stasny. Forthcoming. “Men’s Economic Status and Marital Transitions of Fragile Families.” Demographic Research.  

73. Sharon Sassler andAmanda J. Miller. Forthcoming. "The Ecology of Relationships: The Effect of Meeting Paterns on Cohabiting Couples' Relationship Progression." Journal of Social and PersonalRelationships.

74. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. “The Missing Women in STEM: Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.” Revise and Resubmit.

75. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miler. “We’re Very Careful . . .”: The Fertility Desires andBehaviors of Cohabiting Couples." Revise and Resubmit.

76. Amanda J. Miller and SharonSassler. "Don't Force My Hand": Gender and Social Class Variation in Relationship Progression." Revise and Resubmit.

77. Jessica Su, Sharon Sassler, and Rachel Dunifon. “Better for Baby? Premarital Conceptions, Shotgun Marriage, and Child Well-Being among Children Born to Teen Mothers.” Under Review.

78. Daniel T. Lichter, Sharon Sassler, and Richard Turner. "Cohabitation, Post-Conception Unions, and the Rise in Non-Marital Fertility." Under Review.

79. Sharon Sassler, Soma Roy, and Elizabeth Stasny. 2014. “Men’s Economic Status and Marital Transitions of Fragile Families.” Demographic Research. 30(3):71-110.

80. Sharon Sassler and Amanda Miler. 2014. “We’re Very Careful . . .”: The Fertility Desires and Contraceptive Behaviors of Cohabiting Couples. Family Relations. 63(4): 538-553.

81. Daniel T. Lichter, Sharon Sassler, and Richard Turner. "Cohabitation, Post-Conception Unions, and the Rise in Non-Marital Fertility." Social Science Research. 47:134-147.

82. Sharon Sassler andAmanda J. Miller. Forthcoming. "The Ecology of Relationships: The Effect of Meeting Paterns on Cohabiting Couples' Relationship Progression." Journal of Social and PersonalRelationships.

83. Jessica Su, Sharon Sassler, and Rachel Dunifon. “Better for Baby? Premarital Conceptions, Shotgun Marriage, and Child Well-Being among Children Born to Teen Mothers.” Revise and Resubmit

84. Daniel Carlson, Amanda Miller, Sharon Sassler, and Sarah Hanson. “The Gendered Division of Housework and Couples’ Sexual Relationships: A Re-Examination.” Revise and Resubmit.

85. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, and Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo. “Early Childbearing, Union Status, and Women’s Health at Midlife.” Revise and Resubmit.  

86. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Jennifer Holland. “Transition Points in Sexual Relationships: Life Course Variation or Social Class Differences?” Revise and Resubmit.

87. Amanda Miller and Sharon Sassler. “Don’t Force My Hand”: Gender & Social Class Variation in Relationship Negotiation. Revise and Resubmit.

88. haron Sassler. “Was Attainment of the American Dream Gendered? The Occupational Attainment of Sons and Daughters in the Early 20th Century.” Revise and Resubmit.

89. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. “The Missing Women in STEM? Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.”

90. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Zhenchao Qian. “Drifting, Sliding, or Plummeting? Transitions into Cohabitation and Beyond.”

91. Daniel T. Lichter, Katherine Michelmore, Richard Turner, and Sharon Sassler. “Pathways to a Stable Marriage? Pregnancy and Childbearing among Cohabiting Couples.”

92. Katherine Michelmore and Sharon Sassler. “Explaining the Gender Gap in Earnings in STEM: Does Group Size Matter?”

93. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Zhenchao Qian. 2018. “Transitions from Sexual Relationships into Cohabitation and Beyond.” Demography.55(2):511-534.

94. Dan Carlson, Amanda Miller, and Sharon Sassler. 2018. “Stalled for Whom? Change in Housework and Its Consequences for Mid- to Low-Income Couples.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World.4:1-17

95. Brienna Perelli-Harris, Trude Lappegard, Ann Evans, Fenaba Addo, Stefanie Hoherz, and Sharon Sassler. 2018. “Do Marriage and Cohabitation Provide Benefits to Health in Mid-Life? The Role of Childhood Selection Mechanisms and Partnership Characteristics across Countries.” Population Research and Policy Review.https://doi.org/10.1007/s11113-018-9467-3.

96. Fenaba Addo, Jason Houle, and Sharon Sassler. 2018. “Economic Barrier or a Stigmatizing Mark? The Changing Nature of the Association between Student Loan Debt and Marital Behavior in Young Adulthood.” Journal of Family and Economic Issues. https://rdcu.be/7RVw . Published online September 26, 2018.

97. Xing (Sherry) Zhang and Sharon Sassler. Forthcming, 2019. “The Age of Independence, Revisited: The Role of Parents in Interracial Union Formation.” Sociological Forum.

98. April Sutton, Daniel Lichter, and Sharon Sassler. Revise & Resubmit.“Women Left Behind: Unintended Pregnancy and Fertility in Rural America.” American Journal of Public Health.

99. Amanda Miller, Daniel Carlson, and Sharon Sassler.Revise & Resubmit. “His Career, Her Job, Their Future: Cohabitors’ Orientations Toward Paid Work.”

100. Daniel Carlson, Sharon Sassler, Amanda Miller. "Has the Gender Revolution Stalled? An Analysis of Cohort Change in the Division of Household Labor."

101. Sharon Sassler, Jennifer Glass, Yael Levitte, and Katherine Michelmore. 2017. “The Missing Women in STEM? Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.” Social Science Research. 63: 192-208..

102. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Kristin Smith. 2017. “A Tale of Two Majors: Explaining the Gender Gap in STEM Employment among Computer Science and Engineering Degree Holders.” Social Sciences. 6, 69: doi:10.3390/socsci6030069.

103. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Zhenchao Qian. Forthcoming, 2018. “Transitions from Sexual Relationships into Cohabitation and Beyond.” Demography.

104. Dan Carlson, Amanda Miller, and Sharon Sassler. Forthcoming, 2018. “Stalled for Whom? Change in Housework and Its Consequences for Mid- to Low-Income Couples.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World.

105. Brienna Perelli-Harris, Trude Lappegard, Ann Evans, Fenaba Addo, Stefanie Hoherz, and Sharon Sassler. Conditional Accept. “Do Marriage and Cohabitation Provide Benefits to Health in Mid-Life? The Role of Childhood Selection Mechanisms and Partnership Characteristics across Countries.” Population Research and Policy Review.

106. Sharon Sassler, Katherine Michelmore, and Jennifer Holland. 2016. “The Progression of Sexual Relationships.” Journal of Marriage and Family. 73(3):587-597.

107. Daniel T. Lichter, Katherine Michelmore, Richard Turner, and Sharon Sassler. 2016. “Pathways to a Stable Marriage? Pregnancy and Childbearing among Cohabiting Couples.” Population Research and Policy Review. 35:377-399.

108. Daniel Carlson, Amanda Miller, Sharon Sassler, and Sarah Hanson. 2016. “The Gendered Division of Housework and Couples’ Sexual Relationships: A Re-Examination.” Journal of Marriage and Family. 78:975-995.

109. Fenaba Addo, Sharon Sassler, and Kristi Williams. 2016. “Reexamining the Association of Maternal Age and Marital Status at First Birth with Youth Educational Attainment.” Journal of Marriage and Family. 78:1252-1268.

110. Katherine Michelmore and Sharon Sassler. 2016. “Explaining the Gender Earnings Gap in STEM: Does Field Group Size Matter?” The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences. Issue: The Changing Status of Women and Its Effects on Society, 2(4):194-215.

111. Sharon Sassler, Yael Levitte, Jennifer Glass, and Katherine Michelmore. Forthcoming. “The Missing Women in STEM? Gender Differentials in the Transition to First Jobs in STEM.” Social Science Research. Online publication: 4-NOV-2016. 10.1016/j.ssresearch.2016.09.014

112. April Sutton, Daniel Lichter, and Sharon Sassler. “Women Left Behind: Unintended Pregnancy and Fertility in Rural America.”

113. Fenaba Addo, Jason Houle, and Sharon Sassler. “Economic Barrier or a Stigmatizing Mark? The Changing Nature of the Association between Student Loan Debt and Marital Behavior in Young Adulthood.”

114. Xing (Sherry) Zhang and Sharon Sassler. “The Age of Independence, Revisited: The Role of Parents in Interracial Union Formation.”

115. Sharon Sassler, Fenaba Addo, Trude Lappegard, Brienna Perelli-Harris, Ann Evans, & Marta Styrc. “A Cross-National Comparison of the Consequences of Partnered Childbearing for Mother’s Mid-Life Health.”

116. Amanda Miller, Daniel Carlson, and Sharon Sassler. “His Career, Her Job, Their Future: Cohabitors’ Orientations Toward Paid Work.”

 

Policy Briefs

1. Kristi Williams, Sharon Sassler, Adrianne Frech, Fenaba Addo, and Elizabeth Cooksey. 2013. “Child and Adolescent Health and Well-Being.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 54: 277.

 

Short Notes, Letters, Abstracts, Book Reviews

1. Arland Thornton, William G. Axinn, and Yu Xie. 2007. Marriage and Cohabitation. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press. Reviewed 2008 in Contemporary Sociology, Vol. 37 (5), pp. 441-443.

 

Training Manual and Materials or Technical Report

1. Miller, Amanda and Sharon Sassler. 2017. “Reasons for Cohabitation Mini Qualitative Analysis.” Student classroom activity. Teaching Resources and Innovations Library for Sociology (TRAILS). Http://trails.asanet.org/Pages/Resource.aspx?ResourceID=13460

Sassler is involved with the Cornell Population Center (CPC), and is Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Demography Minor at Cornell.  She is an active member of the Population Association of America (PAA), the American Sociological Association (ASA), and the Eastern Sociological Society (ESS).  She currently serves as Chair of the Family Section of the American Sociological Association for the 2018-2019 Program,.  She is also a member of the IUSSP (International Union for the Scientific Study of Population) Scientific Panel on New and Emerging Family Forms around the World.  She has served as a Council Member for the ASA's Sociology of the Family section (2013-2016), and chaired the Nominations Committee of the Family Section of the ASA (2015) and of the Population Section of the ASA (2013).  From 2007-2010 she served on the Executive Committee of the ESS; during that time, she chaired the Candace Rogers Student Paper award (2010), and chaired the Mirra Komarovsky Book Award (2009) for the ESS.  She also regularly organizes sessions for the PAA and ASA meetings, has served on the Student Award Committee for the Population Section of the ASA, and has participated on the PAA program committee.

Dr. Sassler currently serves as a Deputy Editor for the Journal of Marriage and Family.  She is also on the Editorial Board for several journals, including Demography, Journal of Marriage and Family, and Demographic Research. 

Sassler is a founding member of the Work and Family Researchers Network.  She also was a team member of the Institute for Social Sciences Project on Immigration, titled "Settlement, Integration, and Membership" (2010-2013).  During the Spring of 2013 she was a visiting fellow at the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI) in The Hague.  She was a visiting fellow in Summer 2018 at the Australian National University's Department of Demography.

Dr. Sassler has pesented several public lectures in the past year, one at Australian National University, and another at the University of Minnesota, as well as giving a Plenary Talk at the Australian Population Association's annual meeting.  She also participated in a podcast with Professor Steve Blackburn, Professor of Computer Science and Associate Dean of DIversity and Inclusion at the ANU COllege of Engineering and Computer Science in July of 2018.  Dr. Sassler is also a regular blogger for Psychology Today, and her work is regularly mentioned in news stories on family topics.

 

At Cornell Sassler has taught classes on population, family policy, contemporary relationships, race and public policy, immigration and the family,  comparative family change, research methods, and an honors thesis seminar.  She regularly teaches students abroad, including Populaton Controversies in Comparative Perspectives offered through Cornell in Turin (Italy), and a Faculty-Led Program attached to her undergraduate Population class in Copenhagen, Denmark.

PAM 2150:  Research Methods                                                                                                 PAM 2030:  Population & Public Policy                                                                                     PAM 2031:  Population & Public Policy Faculty Led Program in  Copenhagen

PAM 2390:  Modern Romance 

PAM 3360:  Evolving Families: Challenges to Public Policy

PAM 3370:  Race and Public Policy

PAM 3620:  Population Controversies in Europe

PAM 4980:  Honors Thesis Seminar
PAM 6360:  Race, Immigration, and the Family
PAM 6720:  Demography Pro-Seminar

1995-96.  Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Population Dynamics.
1995.    Ph.D.     Brown University.  Sociology/Demography
1991.    MA        Brown University.  Sociology/Demography
1984.    BA         Brandeis University.  English & American Literature,
Politics. 

I am the Director of the undergraduate minor in Demography.    I oversee the Human Ecology component of the Cornell in Turin program, where we offer a 3 credit PAM course in Turin, Italy.