PAM faculty and staff affirm and extend messages from Human Ecology and University leadership condemning recent acts of racial violence and committing to change. Recent violence, in conjunction with disparate effects of the pandemic, have painfully highlighted the lethal impact of racism, injustice, and inequality and the work we have ahead. PAM has established a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Working Group to lead departmental efforts to address systemic racism and support our community. 

The working group is charged to develop concrete steps and metrics of progress for improving racial diversity, equity, and inclusion in PAM, including changes to our educational programming, training for faculty, staff, and students, forums for deeper learning about racism and anti-racism, initiatives to advance research and engagement to reduce racial inequality, and strategies for increasing our diversity. It has met regularly since July and will continue its work into the academic year.

Please reach out to us at pam_dei@cornell.edu with your concerns and suggestions.

News & Highlights

PAM’s DEI Working Group is offering honoraria for guest speakers in our classes who will add to our course content on race and racial inequality and/or contribute to the diversity of backgrounds and voices that we present to our students.

To apply, please submit a brief request to Kelly Musick with “Spring 2021 Class Speaker Fund” in the subject line and the following information: 1) proposed speaker, course, and topic of guest lecture; 2) how the guest lecture fits into the central learning goals of your course and contributes to diversity in course content and/or backgrounds and voices; 3) whether you will open the guest lecture to students or community members outside your class and why/why not.

We will continue accepting proposals into the Spring, contingent on funding availability.

Following the guest lecture, we will ask you to share a brief survey with your students to assess contributions to the course. We will also ask for any feedback from you on improving this program in the future.

*Only PAM faculty are eligible to request this fund for speakers in their course

PAM Peer-Mentorship

An initiative from the DE&I Working Group that addresses the needs of students by providing a supportive community of peers, upper-class students, faculty members, and alumni for PAM and HCP majors. 

Mentors:
If you are interested in becoming a mentor please fill out this online application. Applicants must be currently enrolled and have completed at least one year of their degree program. For questions or more information about the application process email us at pam-mentoring@cornell.edu.

Mentees:
PAM Freshmen, Sophomores and all PAM Transfer Students are eligible to apply. Mentee applications open at the start of each semester. For more information please email us at pam-mentoring@cornell.edu.

Peer-Mentorship Programs 

PAM Alum speakers

On February, 12th the PAM Peer-Mentorship program hosted an informal coffee chat with PAM alum, Elizabeth Abunaw ’02,  Founder Owner and Operator of Forty Acres Fresh Market; Grenger Charles ’04, Head of Government Relations and ESG Strategy at Amherst Holdings; and Yetunde Ekunwe ’01, Global Banking and Markets Regulatory Data Strategy PMO at Bank of America. PAM students were able to learn, network and ask questions to three of our recent grads.

PAM Conversations on Race and Racism with Mario Small 4/2/21

Mario Small headshotJoin us on Friday, April 2nd from 1:15-2:15pm for a conversation with Mario Small, Grafstein Family Professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. Our discussion, Bridging Sociological and Economic Perspectives on Racial Discrimination, will be based on his JEP article with Devah Pager.

Mario L. Small, Ph.D., is Grafstein Family Professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. Small has published award-winning articles, edited volumes, and books on topics such as urban poverty, personal networks, and the relationship between qualitative and quantitative methods. His books include Villa Victoria: The Transformation of Social Capital in a Boston Barrio and Unanticipated Gains: Origins of Network Inequality in Everyday Life, both of which received the C. Wright Mills Award for Best Book.  His latest book, Someone To Talk To: How Networks Matter in Practice, examines how people decide whom in their network to turn to when seeking a confidant. Small is currently studying the relationship between networks and decision-making, the ability of large-scale data to answer critical questions about poverty, and the role qualitative inquiry in cumulative social science.

Email nmk64@cornell.edu for zoom details

PAM Conversations on Race and Racism with Maria Cancian 4/23/21

Maria Cancian headshotJoin us on Friday, April 23rd from 1:15-2:15pm for a conversation with Maria Cancian, Dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. Our discussion, Reflections on Who Counts and Why it Matters, will be based on her APPAM Presidential Address.

Maria Cancian is Dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. Her research considers the dynamic between public policies and family wellbeing—both how policies shape choices and outcomes for families, and how family change creates new challenges and opportunities for public policy. Ongoing projects analyze the interactions of the incarceration, child welfare and child support systems, as well as the implications of multiple partner fertility for family organization and policy. 

Cancian is the former President of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM), and was elected as the 2018 John Kenneth Galbraith Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

Prior to joining Georgetown University Cancian was a Kellett Professor, and served as Associate Dean for Social Sciences and Fiscal Initiatives, and as Director of the Institute for Research on Poverty, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She also served as Senior Advisor to the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy for the HHS Administration for Children and Families, in the Obama Administration, as a Casey Family Programs Senior Fellow, a W. T. Grant Foundation Distinguished Fellow in residence at the Wisconsin Department of Children and Families, a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California. She received her doctorate in Economics from the University of Michigan.

Email nmk64@cornell.edu for zoom details

Past Events

How To Be An Antiracist Book Discussions 11/6/20 & 12/11/20

Kendi Book Cover

PAM students, staff, and faculty gathered virtually to engage in reflection on how Ibram X. Kendi’s ideas intersect with our department dynamics, practices, and policies. The discussions were centered around Ibram’s book How to Be An Antiracist and were held on November 6th and December 11th.

Coursework Related to DE&I

These lists are intended to help PAM undergraduates who are interested in incorporating content related to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion into their course enrollments. 

We identify two groups of courses below that can count toward the PAM major.  The first of these are courses that have a substantial focus on topics related to racial diversity and equity.  The second group of courses have as part of their course a substantial independent project component, which a student could use if they wished to explore topics related to racial diversity and equity.

Always check the course description to ensure that you meet the prerequisites before enrolling in a course.
 

Spring 2021 Guide for PAM Majors

Courses with a substantial focus on topics of racial diversity and equity:
 

Courses that can count toward the PAM upper level electives (curriculum sheet requirement #2):

  • PAM 4160 – Ethnography of Poverty and Inequality 

Core courses (curriculum sheet requirement #1):  

  • PAM 2030 – Population and Public Policy

Courses that meet Additional PAM Electives (curriculum sheet requirement #3):

  • PAM 2208 – Social Inequality
  • PAM 2810 – Migration: Histories, Controversies and Perspectives

Courses that can count towards the FWS requirement:  

  • ENGL 1111  FWS - Writing Across Cultures, Topic: Feeling Race, Sexuality, and Gender
  • ENGL 1158  FWS - American Voices
  • ENGL 1168 FWS - Cultural Studies

Courses that meet additional requirements (curriculum sheet requirement #13):
*Students should double check the distribution categories to confirm it still meets the requirement

  • COML 4352 – Race and Slavery, Old and Modern
  • ECON 3480 – Race and the American Labor Market in Historical Perspective
  • FGSS 4845 – Labor, Race and Gender
  • GOVT 4846 – Making Equality
  • PHIL 1650 – Philosophy of Race
  • SOC 3570 – Schooling, Racial Inequality, and Public Policy in America
  • SPAN 3580 – Race and Immigration in Spain
  • ENGL 2650 - Introduction to African American Literature

Courses that meet general electives to reach 120 credits to graduate (curriculum sheet requirement # 14):

  • AMST 4658 – Fabricating Race
  • ENGL 2585 - Millennial Jewish Stars: Race, Gender & Sexuality
  • ENGL 4757 – Be a Man! Masculinity, Race, and Nation
  • HADM 4315 – Nonprofit Social Enterprise and Food Justice
  • ILROB 3230 - Advanced Racial Equity in Organizations
  • PSYCH 4800 – Social Psychology of Race and Racism
  • UNILWYL 1450 – Toxic Inequality: Environmental Justice in America

 

Courses with a substantial independent project component, which a student could use if they wished to explore topics related to racial diversity and equity:

 

Courses that can count toward the PAM upper level electives (curriculum sheet requirement #2):

  • PAM 3120 – Research Design, Practice and Policy
  • PAM 3780 – Sick Around the World? Comparing Health Care Systems Around the World
  • PAM 4950 – PAM Engaged Learning Capstone
  • PAM 4540 – Collaborative Modeling Methods for Policy and Program Evaluation

These lists are intended to help HCP undergraduates who are interested in incorporating content related to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion into their course enrollments. 

We identify two groups of courses below that can count toward the HCP requirements.   The first of these are courses that have a substantial focus on topics related to racial diversity and equity.  The second group of courses have as part of their course a substantial independent project component, which a student could use if they wished to explore topics related to racial diversity and equity.

Always check the course description to ensure that you meet the prerequisites before enrolling in a course.

Spring 2021 Guide for HCP Majors

Courses with a substantial focus on topics of racial diversity and equity:
 

Courses that can count toward the Social Policy Concentration (curriculum sheet requirement #3b):

  • PAM 4160 – Ethnography of Poverty and Inequality 

Courses that can count toward the PAM Required Courses (curriculum sheet requirement #2):

  • PAM 2030 – Population and Public Policy

Courses that meet Additional PAM Electives (curriculum sheet requirement #4):  

  • PAM 2208 – Social Inequality
  • PAM 2810 – Migration: Histories, Controversies and Perspectives

Courses that can count towards the FWS requirement:  

  • ENGL 1111  FWS - Writing Across Cultures, Topic: Feeling Race, Sexuality, and Gender
  • ENGL 1158  FWS - American Voices
  • ENGL 1168 FWS - Cultural Studies

Courses that meet Additional Requirements (curriculum sheet requirement #15):
*Students should double check the distribution categories to confirm it still meets the requirement

  • COML 4352 – Race and Slavery, Old and Modern
  • ECON 3480 – Race and the American Labor Market in Historical Perspective
  • FGSS 4845 – Labor, Race and Gender
  • GOVT 4846 – Making Equality
  • PHIL 1650 – Philosophy of Race
  • SOC 3570 – Schooling, Racial Inequality, and Public Policy in America
  • SPAN 3580 – Race and Immigration in Spain
  • ENGL 2650 - Introduction to African American Literature

Courses that count as general electives to reach 120 credits to graduate (curriculum sheet requirement #16):

  • AMST 4658 – Fabricating Race
  • ENGL 2585 - Millennial Jewish Stars: Race, Gender & Sexuality
  • ENGL 4757 – Be a Man! Masculinity, Race, and Nation
  • HADM 4315 – Nonprofit Social Enterprise and Food Justice
  • ILROB 3230 - Advanced Racial Equity in Organizations
  • PSYCH 4800 – Social Psychology of Race and Racism
  • UNILWYL 1450 – Toxic Inequality: Environmental Justice in America

 

Courses with a substantial independent project component, which a student could use if they wished to explore topics related to racial diversity and equity:

 

Courses that can count toward the Health Policy Concentration requirement (curriculum sheet requirement #3a):  

  • PAM 3780 – Sick Around the World? Comparing Health Care Systems Around the World

Courses that can count toward the Additional PAM Electives requirement (curriculum sheet requirement #2)

  • PAM 3120 – Research Design, Practice and Policy
  • PAM 4950 – PAM Engaged Learning Capstone
  • PAM 4540 – Collaborative Modeling Methods for Policy and Program Evaluation

Use the course distribution tool within the Cornell class roster to view classes with a human diversity distribution. Enter either "D-HE" or "D-AG" in the Breadth and Distribution search box to see class details. This tool is limited to CALS and CHE courses, Arts courses related to diversity will not appear in the search. Directions on how to use the distribution tool are available on the registrar’s webpage.

Courses with the D-HE distribution are courses within Human Ecology under the human diversity distribution. Per the Courses of Study in these courses “students will enhance their abilities to communicate with people of different cultural perspectives; to listen carefully and respectfully to the views of others, especially views with which they disagree; and to employ ethical reasoning in judging ideas, actions, and their implications. These courses explore the challenges of building a diverse society, and/or examine the various processes that marginalize people and produce unequal power relations in terms of race, nationality, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, gender, age, or economic status.”   Courses with the D-AG distribution are courses in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences that  “explore the challenges of building a diverse society, and/or examine the various processes that marginalize people and produce unequal power relations.”

PAM Faculty and Student DE&I Initiatives 

Maria Fitzpatrick and Matt Hall, in partnership with the National Education Equity Lab (NEEL), are teaching PAM 2070: Big Data for Big Policy Problems to high school students this 2021 spring semester. Students will learn about important policy issues through both the economics and sociological lenses, how big data are being used to address policy problems, and technical skills for how to begin using data in similar ways to address policy problems.

“A collaboration between eCornell and the nonprofit National Education Equity Lab is giving high school students in underserved communities the opportunity to develop skills in business analytics while also gaining the confidence to recognize they can excel in college.” - Cornell Chronicle, 2020

Featured in this New York Times article >

On Saturday, October 10th, 2020 the PAM PhD program hosted a PAM Preview Day, aimed to raise awareness about the PhD program, and also increase the number of underrepresented Minorities (URM) within future cohorts. Out of the 50 participants, 70% identified as underrepresented Minorities. Participants were able to meet faculty and current graduate students, learn about student life as well as diversity and inclusion at Cornell and also get an in-depth look at the graduate school application process. PAM PhD students, Rene CrespinTatiana Padilla, and Grace Phillips  led the initiative, planning and organizing the entire event. Working with Anitra Douglas-McCarthy, Senior Director of Recruitment and the OISE graduate school recruitment office, the student-led team attracted potential applicants from academic institutions and industry, alike. Padilla said, “Our PAM community came together to acknowledge our duty and agency in improving representation of URM folks in higher education, graduate school and academia”. Although current health and safety measures required the event to be online, it served as a blueprint on how to deliver enriching content in an equitable way.

Resources

All Students, Faculty & Staff
 
All Students
 
  • ALANA Intercultural Board
    Provides programming and funding for programming related to diversity and intercultural efforts.
  • American Indian & Indigenous Studies Program  
    Provides support to students who identify as American Indian or Indigenous, including internship, funding, scholarship, residential life, and other opportunities.
  • Cornell Identity Resources
    Resources on identity and cultural centers and groups, to engage with individuals of similar background or connect with identities other than your own. 
  • LGBT Resource Center 
    A wide variety of resources, information about the LGBT community at Cornell, and ways to get involved.
  • Women’s Resource Center
    While this is open to all female students, the group expresses a specific commitment to women of color.
Undergraduate Students
 
Graduate Students
 
Faculty, Post Docs, TAs & Staff
 
  • Office of Faculty Development and Diversity 
    Provides a range of resources to support faculty development and diversity, including training and support for deans, department chairs, and individual faculty members. 
  • Colleague Network Groups
    University-sponsored groups to support traditionally underrepresented minorities and their allies.

All Students
Undergraduate Students
 
Graduate Students
 
All Students, Faculty & Staff
 
Graduate Students
All Students, Faculty & Staff
 
Faculty, Post Docs, TAs & Staff
 
All Students, Faculty & Staff

PAM Community Survey

The PAM Community Survey collected open-ended responses from students, staff, and faculty about their experiences in the department and ideas for concrete steps we can take to improve racial diversity, equity, and inclusion in PAM. We are grateful to all who shared their experiences and ideas. Click here to see a summary of data we collected from 50 student, staff, and faculty respondents.

Diversity in PAM

The following data offer a benchmark for tracking PAM’s efforts to increase the diversity of our community.

Note: Student counts are as of the end of the sixth week of the 2019 Fall term, and faculty and staff counts are as of July 1, 2020. Data on students registered in absentia, students who are non-degree seeking, and employees seeking degrees through the Cornell Employee Degree Program are excluded. International includes non-U.S. citizens and those with non-permanent resident status. Underrepresented minorities include Black, Hispanic, American Indian, and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, or persons with multiple identities that include one or more of these groups.

PAM and HCP Undergraduate Majors (N=252)
  - International: 7%
  - US Underrepresented Minority: 17%
  - US Other Minority: 24%
  - US White: 44%
  - US Unknown: 8%

Sloan MHA and EMHA Students (N=96)
  - International: 9%
  - US Underrepresented Minority: 21%
  - US Other Minority: 28%
  - US White: 38%
  - US Unknown: 4%

PAM PhD Students (N=22)
  - International: 36%
  - US Underrepresented Minority: 23%
  - US Other Minority: 5%
  - US White: 27%
  - US Unknown: 9%

PAM Faculty (N=28)
  - International: 4%
  - US Underrepresented Minority: 7%   
  - US Other Minority: 7%
  - US White: 82%

PAM Other Academic/Staff (N=36)
  - International: 3%
  - US Underrepresented Minority: 6%
  - US Other Minority: 3%
  - US White: 89%

College-Wide Demographic Data
College of Human Ecology Demographic Data

University-Wide Demographic Data
Cornell University Diversity Dashboard 
Graduate School Diversity Dashboard

National Data
Faculty pipeline PhD Production by Program, Race and Gender
(An online tool, which provides the total number of PhD students by race, gender, and course of study at the top 50 institutions) 
 

Members

Adriana Reyes

Assistant Professor, Policy Analysis and Management

Astride Charles

MHA Student, Sloan Program in Health Administration

Candace Megerssa

Undergraduate Junior, Policy Analysis and Management 

Colleen Carey

Assistant Professor, Policy Analysis and Management and Sloan Program in Health Administration

Doug Miller

Associate Chair & Professor, Policy Analysis and Management and Cornell Institute for Public Affairs

Jen Wright

Undergraduate Advising & Course Coordinator, Policy Analysis and Management (Working Group support)

Julie Carmalt

Associate Director & Senior Lecturer, Sloan Program in Health Administration

Kelly Musick

Professor & Department Chair, Policy Analysis and Management (Committee Chair)

Maureen Waller

Professor, Policy Analysis and Management

Shavasia Williams

Assistant to the Chair, Policy Analysis and Management (Working Group support)

Toyosi  Ibukunoluwa  Ayanwola  Undergraduate Student, Health Care Policy 

Tatiana Padilla

Ph.D. Student, Policy Analysis and Management