The topic of risky decision making is important for both personal decisions and for measurement and control in complex social institutions. (Think of pricing the mysterious "systemic risk" hidden in our highly interlocked financial systems, or avoiding pandemics.)

Risky decision making is studied by researchers in a wide variety of disciplines. This book represents a current snapshot of what is known and a rough guide for future research on how to make sense of the complexity of risk. The editors' recipe: Create as much coherence across evidence from different disciplines as possible, and measure as much about underlying neural mechanisms as you can: then get top researchers working on their respective frontiers to say what they know in a general language that makes shared understanding easy.

Excerpted from the book's Foreword by Colin F. Camerer, Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Economics, California Institute of Technology

People are choice machines.  And new tools have opened new windows on how brains perceive, translate perceptions into choices, and transform choices into behaviors.  The Neuroscience of Risky Decision Making provides the best and most current overview of how brains process a particular kind of information: risk. Although many fields bring important insights about risk to the table, the chapters collected in this book demonstrate why neuroscience deserves to be there and what can be gained from its good company.

Owen D. Jones, Joe B. Wyatt Distinguished University Professor, New York Alumni Chancellor's Chair in Law, and Professor of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University; Director, MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience

In the last decade, neuroscience has vastly improved our understanding of risky decision-making, especially among adolescents. This carefully edited volume showcases the work of some of the field's most original and influential thinkers. It would make a valuable addition to courses in both cognitive neuroscience and adolescent development.

Laurence Steinberg, Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Temple University

Risky decision making is an important topic in psychology, for both theoretical and practical reasons. Not surprisingly, therefore, many hope that the neurosciences will facilitate progress in our understanding of risk taking. In The Neuroscience of Risky Decision Making, Valerie Reyna and Vivian Zayas have compiled chapters by seven groups of investigators that provide a valuable summary of recent progress. Reyna and Zaya bring together renowned scholars in neuroscience, education, psychology and economics to communicate the latest research findings in the areas of risky decision making and neuroscience.

PsycCRITIQUES

Reyna and Zaya bring together renowned scholars in neuroscience, education, psychology and economics to communicate the latest research findings in the areas of risky decision making and neuroscience. Each chapter presents a unique perspective to this emerging area of research and provides thought-provoking predictions about future research and puzzles yet to solve. Both experts and non-experts will learn something after reading this book, as it is an excellent balance of theory and empirical research.

Adriana Galván, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles