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Publications

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2016). Reply To Bastian. Commentary, Pub Med Common. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21300892/#comments)

Ceci, S.J., Williams, W.M.,& Kahn, S. (Eds) (in press). Underrepresentation of Women in Science: International and Cross-Disciplinary Evidence and Debate. Frontiers in Psychology, Special Issue.

Ceci, S.J. & Williams, W.M. (in press). Socio-political values infiltrate the assessment of scientific research. In L. Jussim & J. Crawford (Eds.), The Politics of Social Psychology. London: Taylor & Francis.

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (2015, Oct. 21). Women preferred for STEM professorships as long as they are equal to or better than male candidates. The Conversation.

Ceci, S. J., Williams & W.M. (2015, September 10). Op Ed: Passions supplant reason in dialog on women in science. Chronicle of Higher Education. London: Taylor & Francis.

Williams, W. M. & Ceci, S. J. (2015; June 12). Room for Debate Op Ed: Sexist image of scientists is wrong. The New York Times.

Williams, W.M.& Ceci, S.J., (2015). Describing applicants in gendered language might influence academic science hiring. American Scientist. Published

Ceci, S.J. (2015). Women in the academy: Past, present, and future. In M.J. Feuer, G. White, A. Berman (Eds.) (pages 273-278). The Past as Prologue: The National Academy of Education at 50. Washington DC: National Academy of Education Press.

Ceci, S. J., & Williams, W.M. (2015). Women have substantial advantage in STEM faculty hiring, except when competing against more accomplished men. Frontiers in Psychology, 20

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (in press). Why so few women in mathematically-intensive fields? In S. Kosslyn & R. Scott (Eds.) Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. NY: Wiley & Sons.

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (2015, Fall/Winter). Second Opinions. Pediatrics Nationwide, p. 36.

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (2015, July 16). Experiments and real-world audits both show strong preference for hiring women assistant professors. Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Williams, W.M. & Ceci, S.J., (2015). The myth about women in science. CNN Editorial, Published April 13, 2015

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2015, May 1) Women scientist's academic-hiring advantage is unwelcome news for some, Part 1. The Huffington Post Science

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2015, May 4) Women scientist's academic-hiring advantage is unwelcome news for some, Part 2. The Huffington Post Science

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2015, May 18) Women scientist's academic-hiring advantage is unwelcome news for some, Part 3. The Huffington Post Science

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2015, June 1) Women scientist's academic-hiring advantage is unwelcome news for some, Part 4. The Huffington Post Science

Ceci, S.J., & Williams, W.M. (2015, June 1) Women scientist's academic-hiring advantage is unwelcome news for some, Part 5. The Huffington Post Science

Williams, W.M. & Ceci, S.J. (2015; April 13). National hiring experiments reveal 2:1 faculty preference for women on STEM tenure track. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Williams, W. M. & Ceci, S.J.(2015;April 13). Supplementary Information: Twenty-condition randomized national experiments at 371 universities reveal tenure-track hiring preferences of STEM faculty. (Monograph describing multi-phase national experimental study). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Ceci, S.J., Ginther, D., Kahn, S., & Williams, W.M. (2015) Women in Science: The path to progress. Scientific American Mind, 26

Williams, W. M., Barnett, S.M., & Wethington, E. (in press). What women in science need to know about work-life balance. In Success Strategies of Women in Science: A Portable Mentor (P. Pritchard, Ed.). New York: Elsevier.

Ceci, S.J, & Williams, W.M. (in press). The psychology of psychology: A thought experiment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Williams, W.M. & Ceci, S.J. (November 2, 2014) Academic science isn't sexist. Gray Matter Editorial, The Sunday New York Times

Ceci, S. J., Ginther, D., Kahn, S., & Williams, W. M. (2014). Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape. Psychological Science in the Public Interest , volume 15 (3), 75-141 (whole-issue monograph).

Defraine, W. C., Williams, W. M., & Ceci, S. J. (2014). Attracting STEM talent: Do STEM students prefer traditional or work-life-interaction labs? PLoS One. 9(2): e89801. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0089801

Valla, J. M. & Ceci, S. J. (2014). Breadth-based models of women's underrepresentation in STEM fields: Commentary on Schmidt, and Nye et al. Perspectives in Psychological Science, 9, 219-224.

Williams, W. M., Barnett, S. M., & Sumner, R. A. (2013). Where are all the women in academic science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields? In Handbook of Research on Promoting Women's Careers, Eds. London: Edward Elgar.

Williams, W. M. (2012, Fall). Cornell Institute for Women in Science. Human Ecology Alumni Magazine.

Williams, W. M. & Ceci, S. J. (2012). Scientists and motherhood. American Scientist, June, 2012.

Valla, J. M., & Williams, W. M. (2012). Increasing Achievement And Higher-Education Representation Of Under-Represented Groups In Science, Technology, Engineering, And Mathematics Fields: A Review Of Current K-12 Intervention Programs. Journal Of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering 18(1), 21-53.

Williams, W. M., & Ceci, S. J. (2012). When scientists choose motherhood. American Scientist, 100 (2), 138-145. (Feature article)

Whitecraft, M. A. & Williams, W. M. (2011). Why are there so few women computer scientists? In: Making Software: What Really Works, and Why We Believe It (second edition), ed. G. Wilson. Cambridge, MA: Riley.

Valla, J. & Ceci, S. J. (2011). Can Sex Differences in Science Be Tied to the Long Reach of Prenatal Hormones?: Brain Organization Theory, Digit Ratio (2D/4D), and Sex Differences in Preferences and Cognition. Perspectives in Psychological Science, 6, 134-146.

Ceci, S. J., Williams, W.M., Sumner, R. A, & DeFraine, W. C. (2011). Do subtle cues about belongingness constrain women's career choices? Psychological Inquiry, 22, 255-258.

Ceci, S.J. & Williams, W.M. (2011). . Culture and history important in understanding the low numbers of women in science Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108, doi:10.1073/pnas.1103900108.

Barnett, S.M., Rindermann, H., Williams, W. M., & Ceci, S.J. (2011). The relevance of intelligence for society: Predictiveness and relevance of IQ for societal outcomes. In S. Kaufman & R. J. Sternberg (Eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence. Pages 666-682.

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (2011).. Understanding current causes of women's underrepresentation in science . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,108: 3157-3162 (issue 8); (featured as first article profile in "This Week in PNAS").

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W.M. (2010). Sex Differences in Math-Intensive Fields. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 19(5), 275-279. ("Most downloaded article" of October 2010 on Association for Psychological Science website)

Ceci, S. J., Williams, W. M., & Barnett, S. M. (released 2010). Sex differences in Mathematical and spatial ability. In B. H. Kerr (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Giftedness, Creativity, and Talent. Volume 1, 454-456. New York: Sage.

Ceci, S. J., & Williams, W. M. (2010). The mathematics of sex: How biology and society conspire to limit talented women and girls. New York: Oxford University Press. (Reviewed in Science: Miller, R. T. (2009)., Vol. 326 [20 November 2009], 1063-4.) Women in science: Preferences and penalties differ

Ceci, S. J., Williams, W. M., & Barnett, S. M. (2009, March). Women's underrepresentation in science: Sociocultural and biological considerations. Psychological Bulletin, 135 (2): 218-261.

Ceci, S. J. & Williams, W. M. (Eds.) (2007). Why aren't more women in science? Top researchers debate the evidence . Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association Books.

Williams, W. M. (2001). Women in Academe, and the Men Who Derail Them . Chronicle of Higher Education, Invited Back-Cover Editorial, July 20, 2001.