Martha Holden

 

Martha Holden

Senior Extension Associate, Project Director, Residential Child Care Project
1st Fl., Beebe Hall
 
Phone: 607-254-5337
Email: mjh19@cornell.edu
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Curriculum Vitae
 
Biographical Statement:

Martha J. Holden is a Senior Extension Associate with the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research and the director of the Residential Child Care Project. As project director, she provides technical assistance to implement CARE, a program model for residential child caring agencies, Therapeutic Crisis Intervention System to residential and educational organizations, training programs in violence prevention, and a program in the Investigation of Institutional Maltreatment, throughout the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and Israel. In 1975 Ms. Holden received her M.S. in Mental Health Counseling from Wright State University. She was the lead editor and writer in the 2009 re-development of the Center's Therapeutic Crisis Intervention curriculum, Edition 6, in use from 1982 and the author of the book, Children and Residential Experiences (CARE): Creating Conditions for Change, a best practice model for residential care organizations.

Ms Holden has published in Prevention Science,  Children and Youth Services Review, Child Abuse and Neglect: An International Journal, Child Welfare, Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems,The Scottish Journal of Residential Care, Residential Treatment for Children & Youth, The Japanese Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect, International Journal of Child and Famiy Welfare, and the Journal of Child And Youth Care Work. She has co-authored chapters in the books, Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth: Developing Evidence-based International Practice, Understanding Abusive Families, For Your Own Safety: Examining the Safety of High Risk Interventions for Children and Young People, and Transforming Troubled Lives: Strategies and Interventions for Children with Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Difficulties. In addition to her extensive experience in training and curriculum development, Ms Holden served as an administrator of a residential child care facility overseeing the day to day operation of a residential treatment facility for children, including its education resources from 1979 - 1988. Throughout her career, Ms. Holden has been studying ways to prevent the occurrence of institutional abuse of children through training, investigating and influencing organizational culture.

 
Current Professional Activities:

Martha J. Holden is a Senior Extension Associate with the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research and the director of the Residential Child Care Project. As project director, she provides technical assistance to residential child caring agencies in implementing CARE, a residential care program model, the Therapeutic Crisis Intervention System, a crisis prevention and management system for residential care organizations, training programs in violence prevention, and a program in the Investigation of Institutional Maltreatment, throughout the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, Israel, and Russia.

As director of the RCCP, Ms Holden seeks to maintain a leadership role in developing innovative programs to enable child caring agencies to serve children, youth, and families more effectively by building strong linkages among research, outreach activities, and evaluation efforts. These relationships are viewed as cyclical: research leads to the development of innovative and effective outreach programs, which are carefully evaluated. Evaluation activities contribute directly to the adaptation and improvement of outreach programs and may also contribute to new research. In 2007, the RCCP was awarded the Human Ecology Extension, Outreach, and Public Service Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Extension/Outreach.

The Therapeutic Crisis Intervention System (TCI), Child And Residential Experiences (CARE), and the Institutional Abuse (IAB) components are the main components of the project.  The RCCP’s TCI component works directly with child caring and educational organizations seeking to lower rates of aggressive incidents and high-risk physical interventions.  The RCCP’s CARE component is a multi-level practice model that involves providing residential child care personnel with the capacity to implement a set of core practice principles that are solidly grounded in current social science literature and best practices standards and facilitating organizational changes to support and sustain the implementation of those core principles at all levels of the organization. In addition CARE has been evaluated using a sophisticated quasi-experimental design in North Carolina. The RCCP’s IAB component works with state and local authorities to train child protection professionals to prevent and remediate institutional maltreatment.

 
Current Research Activities:

In the states of North and South Carolina (US) there was a specially funded research project supported by both The Duke Endowment and Cornell University that used a quasi-experimental design in which seven agencies implementing CARE were compared to seven matched non-implementing agencies.  Cornell collected data on implementation, organizational functioning, and staff and child outcomes. These unique data resources, offered an opportunity to conduct a robust evaluation of the CARE model that can have implications for residential care nationally and internationally, as well as to qualify the model as an evidence-based program for residential child care. One paper written about this research has been published in Prevention Science.  Another paper is currently being written.  In addition, a new research project has been initiated with a large New York State child serving agencies that includes 5 separate residential campuses,  several group homes and a variety of services to children and families.

 
Current Public Engagement Activities:

Martha J. Holden as principal investigator and project director provides technical assistance to child caring agencies in implementing CARE, a residential care program model, the Therapeutic Crisis Intervention System, a crisis prevention and management system for residential care organizations, training programs in violence prevention, and a program in the Investigation of Institutional Maltreatment, throughout the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, and Israel.

The RCCP’s TCI component works directly with child caring and educational organizations seeking to lower rates of aggressive incidents and high-risk physical interventions.  The RCCP’s CARE component is a multi-level practice model that involves providing residential and foster child care personnel with the capacity to implement a set of core practice principles that are solidly grounded in current social science literature and best practices standards and facilitating organizational changes to support and sustain the implementation of those core principles at all levels of the organization. In addition CARE is in the process of being evaluated using a sophisticated quasi-experimental design in North and South Carolina. The RCCP’s IAB component works with state and local authorities to train child protection professionals to prevent and remediate institutional maltreatment.

 
Selected Publications:

Izzo, C. V., Smith, E.G., Holden, M.J., Norton-Barker, C.I., & Nunno, M.A., Sellers, D.E. (2016). Intervening at the setting-level to prevent behavioral incidents in residential child care: Efficacy of the CARE program model.  Prevention Science, 17:554-564

Nishizawa, S. Kagami, Y., Anglin, J.P., Holden, M.J., & Grupper, E. (2015). Institutional care and treatment for maltreated children: Toward the collaboration with foster/adoptive care.  Japanese Journal of Child Abuse and Neglect. 17(2), 238-257.

Holden, M.J., Anglin, J., Nunno, M.A., & Izzo, C. (2014). Engaging the total therapeutic residential care program in a process of quality improvement: Learning from the CARE model. In J. Whittaker, F. del Valle, & l. Holmes (Eds.), Therapeutic residential care for children and youth: Developing evidence-based international practice. London, UK: Jessica Kinsgley Publishers.

Nunno, M. A., Sellers, D. E., & Holden, M. J. (2014). Implications of translational research for the field of residential child care. The Scottish Journal of Residential Care, 13(3).

Izzo, C.V., Aumand, B. N., Cash, B.M., McCabe, L.A., Holden, M.J., & Bhattacharjee, M. (2014). Exploration of the youth-adult relationship in residential care: Small glimpses from a large sample of youth. International Journal of Child and Family Welfare, 15 (1/2 Special Issue).

Holden, M.J., Holden, J.C., & Paterson, S. (2012). Developing Preventative Responses to Disruptive and High Risk Behaviours. In J. Visser, (Ed.), Transforming troubled lives: Strategies and interventions with children and young people with social, emotional, and behavioural difficulties. Bingley, UK: Emerald Group Publishing, LTD.

Holden, M.J., Izzo, C., Nunno, M., Smith, E., Endres, T., Holden, J.C., & Kuhn, F. (2010). Children and residential experiences: A comprehensive strategy for implementing a researched-informed program model for residential care. Child Welfare, 89(2), 131-149.

Holden, M.J. (2009). Children and residential experiences: Creating the conditions for change. Washington, D.C.: Child Welfare League of America.

Holden, M. J., & Curry, D. (2008). Learning from the research. In M.A. Nuuno, D.M. Day, & L.B. Bullard (Eds.), For our own safety: Examining the safety of high risk interventions for children and young people (pp. 107-126). Arlington, VA: Child Welfare League of America.

Nunno, M.A., Holden, M. J., & Tollar, A. (2006). Learning from tragedy: A survey of child and adolescent restraint fatalities. Child Abuse & Neglect:  An International Journal, 30 (12), 1333-1342.

Nunno, M. A., Holden, M. J., & Leidy, B. (2003). Evaluating and monitoring the impact of a crisis intervention system on a residential child care facility, Children and Youth Services Review, 25(4). 295-315.

 
Selected Keywords:
trauma informed care, therapeutic residential care, children's institutional care, group homes for children, restraint reduction, preventing institutional abuse, program models for residential care, foster care, special education, crisis intervention systems, special education

 
The information on this bio page is taken from the CHE Annual Report.